7 Comments

  1. Mike Schinkel

    “The PHP world owes a lot to HHVM for helping it push it forward,” Blackbourn said. “Without HHVM, maybe we wouldn’t have seen such incredible performance gains in PHP 7.”

    While true, it is a damn shame that PHP has not adopted the many language improvements of Hack language when compared with PHP 7.x. :-(

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  2. M

    I will stick to HHVM nonetheless.

    It includes some features that won’t be included in PHP for the forseeable future, compiled code is an example.

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  3. Aaron Edwards

    I think it likely that the subset of users who use HHVM are the same ones that forgo the traditional core update processes and rely on tools like Git/Composer. Meaning their usage data does not get sent to wp.org servers. I can’t think of any other reason usage would truly be in the “dozens”.

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    • M

      Exactly, especially when you make use of the compilation feature I mentioned above.

      Also, HHVM has 14560 stars on GitHub, which would imply some solid usage.

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      • Alec

        HHVM had its moment in the sun but Facebook never added the developers to increase compatibility with the outside world. We had some big sites on HHVM and the ongoing small, niggling but site crippling bugs drove us back into the waiting and friendly arms of true open source PHP 7.

        HHVM quick rise and demise in the WordPress world is a case study in how not to take over an open source niche (benign neglect).

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        • M

          The main reason it didn’t stick further is that the regular hosts didn’t adopt it, only a few managed hosts launched some betas. A majority of them are still on outdated PHP versions and will never go the HHVM route.

          Regarding bugs, I encountered some of them myself that I had to accomodate but with newer versions they simply disappeared and everything works flawlessly now.

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