Participate In The 2013 Webhosting Review

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WPShout has announced the return of their webhosting review for 2013. Unlike other hosting reviews, this one contains no affiliate links and has user submitted data.

It’s over two years since the inaugural Hosting Review, and it’s now time to update the results with some fresh data. A lot has changed in the last two years: managed hosting is now all the range, the cost of basic shared hosting has fallen and some innovative solutions have popped up to power enterprise-level hosting.

The idea here is simple. Below you’ll find a survey in which you can fill in some details about your host(s). I’ll then collate all that data into a set of recommendations which will be published here on Shout. Collectively, we can create a community and data driven review of the best WordPress hosts.

While the first run in 2011 had over 250 responses, the goal is to push that amount even higher. The more people who truthfully respond to this survey, the better the data will be for everyone. The survey will be open until July 14th where the responses will be tabulated and shared with the public. It will be interesting to see how many results this year will be from folks on managed WordPress hosting accounts such as WPEngine or DreamPress.

1 Comment


  1. Well, that was a nice surprise.

    I clicked on the link to the WPShout site, and the survey is embedded right in their Post!

    No 3rd-party survey-operator? Whom yet-again I’ve never heard of, and doubtless never will hereafter?
    =====

    I’ve had 3 hosts in the past. I’m not currently online. I have a WordPress installation on a WAMP (MS Windows) localhost. This is the only thing I do on Windows anymore, and am solidly migrated to Linux/Ubuntu.

    I did a lot of heavy messing around with my old Ubuntu, and created a bunch of issues, some of which have interfered with hosting myself on it. These will all resolve, when I do a major full upgrade.

    (Linux does not have as nicely-developed made-to-order localhosting options as we see for Windows. Basically, you just install a full server (or download & install the distro Server Edition … then put your choice of GUI on that), and then, ‘well-sure’, Apache includes the normal WWW localhost internal addy & directory-hooks. It’s more ‘raw-boned’ than in Windows, but otoh, the full-boat server-environment (LAMP) is a far-better-supported option.)

    I aim to be back online this summer. I most likely will not use a large/name-brand host. I will either host on my local ISP (who do a lot of this for local businesses & individuals) or I will host myself on my home-computer. The later is mainly an issue of bandwidth, which is very poor for me. However, there are hot rumors right now, that we have a new service that will deliver serious connectivity-speeds to our isolated homes.

    If bandwidth issues are fixed, and possibly even if they don’t, I will put a website on my desktop. My ISP also helps folks, both businesses & private, run full servers at their own locations, on their own equipment. This is common business-practice in the local/small-fry ISP/hosting field, all over the country.

    This is not as cheap as shared hosting, of course, but it is affordable for sure.

    I did not take the Survey, since I don’t have current experience with a host.

    Report

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