WordPress.com Makes Me Hulk Smash

Every now and then I’ll have a reason to visit WordPress.com. I don’t visit the site often so occasionally, I’ll see redesigns that have occurred that throw me for a loop. This is one of those times. 99% of the time when I visit, it’s to login to the dashboard of my .com blog. The old design contained a series of Freshly Pressed posts, a navigation menu at the top and bottom of the website and was generally easy to navigate. However, when I log into WordPress.com in its current state, I’m greeted with a giant road block. This is when I begin the process of looking around the site to figure out where the link is to go straight to the dashboard of my website. The first place I look is the top area of the right-hand sidebar, clicking on links that I think will take me to where I need to go.

WordPress.com Right Hand Sidebar

Nope, not there. I scroll down the website to find the footer with the links I need and nope, not there either. At this point, I’m frustrated, wanting the old WP.com design back. I start thinking that I’m on the wrong page. I find a way to logout, type WordPress.com into my address bar thinking I’m not on the correct site and once again, a blue page loads. After clicking on every other link on this page, I finally discover that the top menu has a link called My Blogs that has the dashboard login link I was looking for. What angers me about this experience is that I don’t use WordPress.com reader at all yet it’s the default active tab when I login. Most of my frustrations would disappear if instead, the My Blogs tab was activated by default.

WordPress.com Reader Tab

It’s equally as frustrating trying to find the official WordPress.com blog. So many wasted clicks trying to find that one stupid link which should be at the footer of the site on every page. I’ve given up looking for it on the site. Instead, I end up going to Google to find it that way. I don’t know who’s idea it was to create some sort of gateway page that is completely separate from the original WordPress.com but it’s like a giant blue obstacle course. The original WordPress.com design was at least consistent.

I want to know if I’m the only one with this type of routine experience with WordPress.com? One things for sure, WordPress.com does a great job at making me feel like an idiot.

6 Comments


  1. I just do my old wp-admin thing on my blog… like when I’m logging into my WordPress.org blog, and that works just fine. :) So I go to http://sitename.com/wp-admin log-in and I’m in my dashboard… no looking around for a button or link.

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  2. @David Peralty – Yeah, I realize I could bookmark things or just remember a URL but if I have to do that then something is wrong. I or anyone else shouldn’t have to remember URL’s or use bookmarks. We should be able to navigate to a spot, easily find where to go and just go. No extra clicks necessary.

    @Scott Kingsley Clark – I just finally had it with my bad experiences trying to navigate what I thought was WordPress.com. Because of that blue page with Reader and such, I don’t even think I’m on WordPress.com when I login. It’s not consistent with the actual WP.com website design.

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  3. Nope, it’s not just you. I’ve hated the way wordpress.com has been laid out for some time now. It takes forever to find the stuff I’m actually looking for, so I go miles out of my way to avoid visiting the site. You’d think that, for an organization that’s built such a wonderful tool like WordPress, they’d have put at least a little bit of thought into the usability of their .com side of things.

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  4. It’s simple: the average user looking for a service like WP.com wants something like Tumblr: not just a blog, but baked-in social features so other users can follow them. (Because people can’t be bothered to figure out RSS.)

    They’re just following demand.

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  5. @redwall_hp – if you take the above post and replace every mention of wordpress.com and blog with the word “tumblr” then it still makes sense, and is just as valid

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