WordPress Code Reference is Now Live

Siobhan McKeown announced that the first version of the WordPress Code Reference is now live. It’s still in the very early stages of development but is now out in the wild so that people can help contribute. Go try it out to see how easy it is to search the WordPress code base.

The reference was created as part of the devhub project to make it easy for developers to find more information about WordPress’ functions, classes, methods, hooks, and filters. After a few quick searches, I found that the search function is actually quite forgiving and will return results that are similar to what you were looking for, even if you spell it wrong.

wordpress-code-reference

How can you help improve the reference?

McKeown said that current development for the parser will continue on Github and you can open a ticket there to offer feedback on issues and enhancements. Tickets for the code reference theme can be found on meta trac. Very soon you’ll be able to submit code examples to the reference, McKeown said:

Please feel free to add tickets to meta trac if there are any issues you encounter, and if there’s a feature or enhancement you’d like we can discuss that too. We do have the functionality ready for submitting examples, we just need a few parser things fixed before we can deploy it.

The documentation team has been working at a feverish pace to completely overhaul WordPress docs to make them more useful to the community. The contributor handbooks have a new design that is now live on the core, mobile, docs, and polyglot handbooks. If you want to get in on the fun and help to make WordPress docs more awesome, join the Docs team at their weekly meeting Thursdays at 23:00 UTC in IRC on the #wordpress-sfd channel.

5 Comments


  1. This looks great. I tried it out and it works well. I would love to see this reference data be made available via an API of sorts. Then it could be integrated directly into IDE’s and other WP help apps

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    1. It goes without saying that all of this information is coming directly from the WordPress source code. We’re literally parsing the information out into a code reference.

      Most modern IDE’s are already privy to most of this information, though some of the specialized things, like hook documentation, may be a little ways off. I believe PhpStorm 8 will be shipping with some integrated WordPress functionality.

      All that said, both the WP-Parser plugin and theme are open source.

      You can find and contribute to WP-Parser here: https://github.com/rmccue/WP-Parser
      And you can find a basic copy of the theme here: https://github.com/rarst/wporg-developer , though development has moved to meta.trac.wordpress.org.

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  2. This is an awesome tool for developers… Really great way to quickly search core and find the info you are looking for. I feel like 9 times out of 10 the full codex page is overkill for me. I’m usually just looking to see if a function already exists, or how to modify it. I also think this will help developers discover new functionality in WordPress because of the results a simple search returns. In the long run this will definitely contribute to better written code by plugin & theme authors.

    I didn’t even know I wanted this, and I already can’t live without it.

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