7 Comments

  1. Kevin Trye

    I can understand why this occurred. A few years back we organized our first wordcamp in our local city (Auckland). The low ticket price forced upon us by WordPress/Automatic definitely created problems in credibility and even just organizing decent refreshments for the event. Yes, it was well sponsored, but a $40 attendee cost (which includes lunch) is madness. Many organizers end up burnt out and never want to run a second one. I’d suggest US$125 (students/seniors) and $250 for all others as a better figure. This is still under half of similar IT events. It would result in a better event and likely more attendees since there’d be more budget for marketing and professional speakers.

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    • Miroslav Glavic

      newbies and for small businesses $250 can be a high price.

      WordCamps are supposed to be about the local community not professionals.

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  2. Basilakis

    Automattic should be in place, in such things and fix that process.
    A company that ” owns ” 28% of the web, should be able to work that stuff around.
    Most of the countries have WordPress for their official org sites, so I am sure that if they get an email from the creators and ask for some way of help, things would be easier.

    It is amazing what all of us do from our sides to support WordPress.
    WordPress should be able to support us also ( in a way of us attending the events ) :)

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    • Miroslav Glavic

      Most of the countries have WordPress for their official org sites, so I am sure that if they get an email from the creators and ask for some way of help, things would be easier.

      I have worked with around 80 government departments in Europe, Asia and the Americas, that statement you said is not true.

      They tend to have their own customized code. Which makes it a pain in the nostril to transfer it to WordPress.

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  3. Miroslav Glavic

    You (and everyone else) have no right to enter any country outside your country of birth. If you don’t live in your country of birth and are a citizen of that new country then you have no ride to enter any country outside your country of birth and your country of residence.

    Also, think about it, if you are not in Europe, you could be spending $1000-$2000 on plane ticket, $300-$1000 on hotel for the weekend, food and the cost of any local attraction you do outside WordCamp like a museum, bar, etc…

    All for a $40 ticket. If I wasn’t involved in the WordPress Community and I was Immigration, I’d grant you the visa then as soon as you set food on my country, I’d have you sent to a hospital to have you examined.

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    • Knut Sparhell

      You:

      You (and everyone else) have no right to enter any country outside your country of birth.

      A statement generalized to the extent that it’s completely untrue. EU says (example):

      For all EU citizens, citizenship implies: the right to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States (Article 21 TFEU) (2.1.3);

      And not true for the many having sole citizenship in a country they was not born, like legal immigrants, born when parents were temporary residing outside their own country, and adopted people.

      “Country of birth” define rights, in most cases, but by far not all.

      For non-Europeans, the primary criteria for being allowed should be that they have the necessary means to support their planned stay. The ticket price should be irrelevant, even when unusually low for a professional conference.

      I guess, by your last statement, you are trying to insult some people.

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