13 Comments

  1. richard Ginn
    · Reply

    Sure a website could be made up of nothing but blocks although a theme would still need some PHP files right.

    One post or page will have to have sections though right??

    possible pre header section
    header section
    Pre Main Content section
    Main Content section
    Post Main content section
    Footer section.

    Throw in display options for each sections and you are good to go.

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  2. Jocelyn
    · Reply

    This concept seems to take current page builders such as Beaver Builder and Themer to the next level. I will be interested to see where the idea goes. Even though I am a web developer, I have always been in favor of empowering site owners to do as much as they can for themselves.

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  3. Anh Tran
    · Reply

    Ultimately, any WordPress user with the correct capabilities (example: administrator WordPress role) will be able to access these templates in the WordPress admin, edit them in dedicated views and potentially export the templates as a theme.

    This is awesome. I imagine the future of themes will be more focusing on customization from some HTML templates. And that makes WordPress more like Blogspot or Tumblr and more fun.

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  4. Benjamin Intal
    · Reply

    I think this is a great step in the direction of making blocks the central theme here (get it?).

    Being able to build theme templates using blocks makes it easier to build themes, and more importantly, how users can customize their themes.

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  5. Mizzinc
    · Reply

    Branding/Website Design will still be paramount not matter how many empowered tools you provide the end-user.

    These tools will lift the entire markets knowledge, which is welcomed.

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  6. NoOne
    · Reply

    He who forgets history is doomed to repeat the past. While it must be a noble-feeling to enable all humans to become designers, the “everyone enabled” thinkers forget to think deeply beyond code. Everytime in our past that we have put tools into everyone’s hands, the results have been the same: a surge in mediocrity, a loss of the excellence brought by professionals, a proliferation of poorly done work, a decrease in the value. Look at the so-called logo industry. Automation has devalued logos to the point of marginalization. The list is long.

    Long live the good feeling from enabling all. Long live the growth of mediocrity — of a web where already 95 percent of websites are rarely visited.

    One might argue that writing is easy. All you must do is cross out the wrong words. The trouble starts when humans cannot figure out what to cross out.

    Now let the posting of words that praise begin, let them swell into 100 feet waves, let them fill a screen with what we now interpret as loud clapping noise. But noise proves naught. A chicken cackles so loudly you would think she had laid a unique and exciting boulder, when upon looking more closely, it is nothing but another common egg.

    Carry on. Carry on.

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  7. Gary Taylor
    · Reply

    Interesting. We could move to a model whereby the .html theme files are, in a sense, a custom post type similar to the difference between Pages and Posts in a standard installation.

    With standardised .css calls and block names, a change in theme would only require a change in stylesheet. I suspect a really good theme designer would then have to explain how s/he designed their sample theme, which blocks they used where, so that users know how to get the same experience themselves.

    So… yeah. Interesting.

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  8. Ben
    · Reply

    I think those .html files should be .php files for flexibility. I also hope they are planning to load the full page content in the viewable source code of the pages for SEO reasons.

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    • Ben
      · Reply

      I think that an even better idea would be to allow .html and/or .php files for the template files. .html may be easier for newer developers, while .php could give stronger developers more flexibility like they are used to.

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  9. Chip Bennett
    · Reply

    Why does it seem like we’re coming full-circle, and trying to turn WordPress into Geocities?

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    • Tomas M.
      · Reply

      Chip, to me it is interesting how new themes will co-exist with “classic” themes on WP.org as for at least 2-5 years there will be users still on older WP versions or on newer versions, but with Classic Editor installed.

      It looks that theme authors will be forced to post modern iteration of their themes as new themes, otherwise I do not see how in practical way theme author can serve “classic” theme to users without Gutenberg and “modern” theme to users with Gutenberg.

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  10. Sajan Kota
    · Reply

    Hi Justin, this seems like a great step. I feel that at this point of time Gutenberg is half baked and needs to go through a lot drastic changes to compete with popular page builders. The proposed system will not revolutionize website building. There are many tools and system already available today using which anyone can build websites. However not everyone will able be able to create great website for various reasons. I hope the future is bright for the WordPress ecosystem.

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