Gutenberg 2.0 Released With Numerous Accessibility and Keyboard Navigation Improvements

Gutenberg 2.0 is available for testing and includes a changelog that's a mile long. Accessibility, keyboard navigation, and the ability to drag-and-drop multiple images to the Gallery block are among the improvements listed.

Clicking the Publish button displays options in the sidebar rather than a drop-down menu to add polish to the publishing flow.

Publish Button Options In The Sidebar

The Table of Contents has been redesigned to increase readability and copying and pasting has also significantly improved. 

Gutenberg 2.0 covers a lot of ground and the changes are too numerous to list here. However, Matias Ventura does a great job listing the changes with links to Pull Requests on GitHub where people can see how they were made.

If you haven't tried or tested Gutenberg, now is a great time to check it out.

14 Comments


  1. Have anyone here noticed that since version 4.9 of WordPress the amount of Guternberg blocks for download has gone up big time.

    I have seen a form block, google map block, feature block, amazon block and more….

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    1. Yes, and also I’ve seen some blocks in the repository that really should be custom post types, instead.

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  2. My problem with Gutenberg is that if I want to test it and then go back to the regular/classic editor, I can’t see my content due to HTML comments. I wish it were more compatible with the classic editor so I can use them interchangeably.

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  3. It would be great if a tool such as the one at GenerateWP adds support for generating code for Gutenberg blocks and templates. Hope someone knowledgeable comes up with something like that.

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  4. I really don’t get Gutenberg.. I’m not a serious professional blogger nor do I know a lot about layouts etc.. All this talk of blocks and layout really goes way over my head and i know I’m not alone.

    I’m seriously worried that if Gutenberg is made the default editor then it will drive the casual blogger away from WordPress…

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    1. Test out the free version of the elementor plugin and get used to a page builder plugin. That can help you get used to idea like blocks.

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      1. I tried it for the first time some minutes ago and I absolutely hate it. I use Elementor Pro everyday and Elementor is so much easier to use and more intuitive. I am not the technical guy. I don’t like Gutenberg because of it’s usability which is very subjective. I just hope that I am not forced into using it (I am not that into the lively discussion).

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  5. The more I try Gutenberg, the more I dislike it compared to the classic editor. I’ve used builders, and they make sense for pages or site builds.

    But to use a builder/blocks for individual posts seems overkill, and far less intuitive than what’s currently used.

    As Steve mentions, I can see a lot of casual bloggers and content creators moving away from WordPress because of this (I’m already hearing from friends who moved to the platform, and their decision to probably move away again because of the new editor).

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    1. I’ve had the same experience. The last few iterations don’t feel like they are moving things definitively in an improved direction. It’s not as good for regular writing as the current editor is and as a page building experience it is unremarkable.

      I’m game for WP taking a risk and even support the introduction of breaking changes, but only if we’re introducing a quantum leap forward. This is far from it. And now WP will be tethered to React for the foreseeable future, it’s just so incredibly demotivating as a developer as well as a regular user.

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  6. I think the page builders were doing just fine. Why would anyone have the idea of gutenberg which would add the functionality of page builders into WordPress.

    I think right now WP is not taking user feedback and trying to compete against Wix, Weebly and probably Squarespace and hence even with Jetpack and WordPress.com it has started offering 200 themes etc.

    Where are we heading actually?

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    1. Everyone was using different page builder and there was no official standard. Gutenberg brings that standard and Page Builder will still work.

      Gutenberg is not a page builder. It’s a block-based content builder. And yes, it’s also a way to think about the future and competing with other blogging platforms out there.

      I hate Gutenberg for my fair share of time but once I got familiar with how it works and doing some coding, I’ve enjoyed it very much and can’t wait for it to come to core.

      As I only write and don’t use page builders, Gutenberg seems like a good choice. WordPress is a blogging software to being with.

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  7. ok now I am confused. Is Gutenberg supposed to be fixing the problem of easier publishing – or is it supposed to be a page builder tool? I really thought it was a publishing enhancer – but people keep talking about it as if it will solve for the page-building experience, which I really can’t see it doing right now.

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