Atom Editor Package Adds Autocomplete for WordPress Actions and Filters

Nearly two years ago, GitHub open sourced Atom, its new JavaScript-powered text editor. GitHub designed Atom to be extensible, which has helped to quickly grow its adoption around the web. Developers at Facebook used it to make Nuclide, an entire suite of Atom packages that create the first IDE with support for Hack development. The folks at Nylas are in the process of forking Atom to create a fast, flexible mail client, thanks to Atom’s “solid foundation for JavaScript on the desktop, and its application code.”

There are currently 3,496 packages available to extend Atom, including one that offers autocomplete for WordPress hooks. Joe Hoyle, co-founder of Human Made and contributor on the WP REST API project, is the author of the package, which has been downloaded 1,295 times to date. As you’re typing in Atom, WordPress actions and filters appear as a dropdown with short descriptions for each.

wp-autocomplete-atom

Packages published to Atom.io are available for installation via the Preferences > Settings > Install menu. Simply visit this screen and search for “autocomplete-wordpress-hooks” to add the package to your editor.

atom-install-packages

If you find any bugs with the package, you can report them on the Autocomplete WordPress Hooks GitHub repository. For more open source packages related to WordPress development, check out the Atom.io package library.

14 Comments


  1. I really like Atom. It’s great that we can now code in a pure Open Source IDE (ATOM), with an open source browser (FF), for an open source project (WP). Open Source it all!

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  2. I prefer my IDE to be more clunky, thus .. Geany. And the WP Autocomplete add-on (or whatever one likes to call it) has been around for quite some time ..

    .. tried Atom though. Several times. Buggy, crashy, sloppy, slooooow loading performance. Nope. Back to Geany. Works on any platform OOTB. Secondary IDE is Netbeans though.

    But I guess, for Apple Followers, Atom is THE thing ..

    @Matt: So .. uhm .. yeah? Why do we have that “now”? We already have been having that for ages. Above mentioned Geany, for example. Or Eclipse (which IMNSHO is a total PITA, but still – Open Source IDE; AFAIR Aptana Studio is based on it, too). Or the afforementioned Netbeans. All fancyful shiny IDEs, cross-platform, reliable, working, with browser components of your choice (at least with Netbeans, and with a bit of work, also with anything Eclipse-based).

    cu, w0lf.

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    1. If you’ve not used atom lately you should really give it a try, all of the extensibility is very nice to have.

      Also, not sure if it was intended, but you’re coming off rather arrogant in your comment.

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  3. Wow.. How did i miss this? Now just need import function to adding some special action/filter to automatically add to package.

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  4. I flip back and fourth between Brackets and Sublime. Gonna give Atom a try soon! Thx

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  5. I really want to make the switch to Atom (and willing to!) but I still find it to be slower than Sublime – even after the most recent 1.3 update .

    For instance, updating packages and running a find-and-replace produces a noticeable slowdown in Atom compared to Sublime. I know that improvements to the speed of Atom has been underway so I plan to keep my eye on the development.

    All that aside, kudos to HumanMade! I do believe that Atom will soon outperform Sublime and look forward to trying this out

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  6. I tried Atom last year, and was initially excited about it. Too many missing necessities, and I stuck with Sublime.

    A few months ago, I tried Visual Studio Code, and wound up completely switching from Sublime. It’s really really nice!

    If you’re not familiar with VS Code, it’s a completely different application than Visual Studio, open source, built on HTML5. Integrates with Git and Gulp. There’s also an ‘Extension Marketplace’ with lots of addons, even though it’s fairly new.

    Never thought I’d see the day, but I’m consciously choosing to use and am excited about a Microsoft product.

    Check it out! https://code.visualstudio.com/

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  7. I switched to using Brackets and Atom on my Windows machine, and still use Sublime on Mac, just because I feel some odd loyalty to it. But I got frustrated with Sublime on Windows, and switched, and haven’t looked back. Both Atom and Brackets have some really nice features, and this package just means I’ll spend even more time in Atom. If you haven’t tried them lately, you should. I used them when they were both pretty new, and wasn’t super-impressed, but that was then, and they’ve both now come into their own, and are just getting better.

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  8. So far I’ve tried Sublime Text, Atom and Brackets in Windows. All of them have some great features and lots of plugins/extensions.

    Sublime pros:
    – It is the smoothest when it comes to responsiveness and lack of lagging
    – It has better keyboard shortcuts
    – Overall I found it the most reliable of all
    – Supports lots of languages

    Sublime cons:
    – It is developed by a single person, which makes its release cycle slower
    – It has a bigger learning curve compared to the others, since many of its features require from you to learn how to use its command line
    – On Windows touch devices like my Surface Pro 2, scrolling via touch is missing

    Atom pros:
    – If I am not mistaken, it’s partially open source (it is backed by GitHub)
    – Has lots of plugins and faster release cycle than Sublime
    – Tries to mimic Sublime on many aspects, so if you if you are get used to Sublime you will easily get used to Atom too

    Atom cons:
    – In my setup I found it to be annoyingly laggy on occasions (eg. some times I started typing only to see the text written a few moments later)
    – Tries to mimic Sublime on many aspects, so if you if you are not familiar with Sublime you might need some time to adjust

    Brackets pros:
    – Open source (backed by Adobe)
    – Frequent updates (even though for the next few months Adobe’s developers are working on incorporating it to DreamWeaver and updates won’t be so frequent)
    – Lots of plugins
    – It has it’s own way of doing things, which I found it to be a good thing, since on some things it seems more logical than Sublime and Atom. If this is your first such editor, you will probably get the hang of it faster compared to Atom or Sublime
    – it includes some interesting unique features, especially if you are a web developer, like live page update while you type and integration with Photoshop

    Brackets cons:
    – It’s less laggy than Atom, but not as smooth as Sublime text. The fact that I read that about a year ago it was behind Atom on that aspect, though, is encouraging for further improvement
    – It still has some annoying bugs. The most important for me is that sometimes it doesn’t keep the undo history after you hit the save button.
    – It has good support for web development languages (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) but its not good with the rest. Even PHP support is poor compared to Atom and Sublime.

    At the moment I find all three of them good but I am not completely happy with none. I marginally prefer Brackets with the hope that the major bugs will be fixed soon and support for PHP will get improved. The fact that it will soon be the editor of Dreamweaver might be encouraging that in the long term it will have a more steady release cycle and frequent new features.

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  9. So far I’ve tried Sublime Text, Atom and Brackets on Windows. All of them have some great features and lots of plugins/extensions.

    Sublime pros:
    – It is the smoothest when it comes to responsiveness and lack of lagging
    – It has better keyboard shortcuts
    – Overall I found it the most reliable of all
    – Supports lots of languages

    Sublime cons:
    – It is developed by a single person, which makes its release cycle slower
    – It has a bigger learning curve compared to the others, since many of its features require from you to learn how to use its command line
    – On Windows touch devices like my Surface Pro 2, scrolling via touch is missing

    Atom pros:
    – If I am not mistaken, it’s partially open source (it is backed by GitHub)
    – Has lots of plugins and faster release cycle than Sublime
    – Tries to mimic Sublime on many aspects, so if you if you are get used to Sublime you will easily get used to Atom too

    Atom cons:
    – In my setup I found it to be annoyingly laggy on occasions (eg. some times I started typing only to see the text written a few moments later)
    – Tries to mimic Sublime on many aspects, so if you if you are not familiar with Sublime you might need some time to adjust

    Brackets pros:
    – Open source (backed by Adobe)
    – Frequent updates (even though for the next few months Adobe’s developers are working on incorporating it to DreamWeaver and updates won’t be so frequent)
    – Lots of plugins
    – It has it’s own way of doing things, which I found it to be a good thing, since on some things it seems more logical than Sublime and Atom. If this is your first such editor, you will probably get the hang of it faster compared to Atom or Sublime
    – it includes some interesting native features, especially if you are a web developer, like live page update while you type and integration with Photoshop

    Brackets cons:
    – It’s less laggy than Atom, but not as smooth as Sublime text. The fact that I read that about a year ago it was behind Atom on that aspect, though, is encouraging for further improvement
    – It still has some annoying bugs. The most important for me is that sometimes it doesn’t keep the undo history after you hit the save button.
    – It has good support for web development languages (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) but its not good with the rest. Even PHP support is poor compared to Atom and Sublime.

    At the moment I find all three of them good but I am not completely happy with none. I marginally prefer Brackets with the hope that the major bugs will be fixed soon and support for PHP will get improved. The fact that it will soon be the editor of Dreamweaver might be encouraging that in the long term it will have a more steady release cycle and more frequent new features compared to the others.

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  10. I really tried to use Atom. I like its simplicity, UI, extensibility. Used it for some time until one of the latest updates made it terribly slow, lagging even typing the simple stuff and with very few extensions. I had to go back to Brackets, which has come a long way. I don’t feel so familiar with Brackets but couldn’t find a solution for the performance issues with Atom. It’s a pity though.

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  11. FINALLY! I’ve been wanting this feature for ages. I might finally move over from sublime permanently.

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  12. I do not even consider an editor (brackets) that can’t be run from a commandline like this: brackets filename.xxx….

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