28 Comments


  1. Jeff,

    I use Live Writer. I set the post date for a date in the future and then I go to WordPress and take care of the small number of things I can’t do in Live Writer. (i.e. series numbering, meta description, grammar check) I would definitely use a WordPress desktop app/program.

    Bruce

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    • Is there anything about Live Writer you dislike? What are the reasons you use Live Writer instead of WordPress outright to create your content?

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      • One reason is that I started with it five years ago and I don’t want to change. :) I find it easier to get around in and it handles my writing workflow well.

        That said, Microsoft has done very little to keep Live Writer up to date. They have squashed a few bugs but that is about it. I would love to see it have a grammar checker, ability to edit/add meta description, support WordPress video/audio short code in preview. It handles categories and tags quite well and I have no problem with graphics.

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    • I used to use Live Writer as well until a few years back when I realised while WordPress advanced, Live Writer was just stuck in the past. I like the ability to add image files and galleries easily with the WordPress editor which Live Writer didn’t let me do.

      And, after I switched to my Mac, I could never find a good enough alternative to Live Writer. So, for now, it’s the WordPress editor for me.

      I use WordPress for Android and while it does enable basic functionality, it’s far far away from giving the experience that you get with the desktop interface

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  2. Aren’t there already native blog clients, based on a common XMLRPC protocol? It’s a good idea, but I could never get used to them. I compose any remotely serious post in a text editor, run it through Markdown, then copy-paste into WP. It’s more comfortable, and that way I have a backup before the post is even published!

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  3. Blackberry/Android/IOS For WordPress Apps (or whatever they are called)…don’t they do what you are saying in this post?

    Firefox has an add-on, I use Chrome now a days. I am sure Chrome has one too.

    What if you have media to upload?

    Would I have to put a place holder and then when post syncs, will the syncing upload the photo/video/etc or would I have to do that part manually?

    I used the BBWP app but when I switched phones to my Galaxy S4, Haven’t used android for WP App.

    Could be because I now have a laptop and laptop typing is way better than on a GS4.

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  4. I feel this is probably an area that WordPress has regressed a little bit – the lack of great offline editors. About 5-6 years ago there was the great w.bloggar which is sadly no more. Would be AMAZING to get a good one, particularly as there’s still a section of my clients at least who write in Word before copying it accross.

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  5. Phil Friel

    I write everything up offline in a Notepad text file. Format=Title first, list of categories second, list of tags third, and finally the article itself, complete with all HTML tags. Then it’s just a matter of copy/pasting everything over to WordPress when I’m online. And as Felix said above, this ensures that you always have a complete backup. But a proper offline editor would definitely be nice, and would be something I’d certainly take a look at.

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  6. Mark

    This would be great – I’d use it. A friend is going to work abroad and was looking for a solution like this to allow them to blog about it. They would only get an internet connection every week or so. I tried to show them the existing solutions for WP, but nothing suited their use case. Please do this.

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  7. Jeff,

    Thanks for the coverage! To be honest, I wasn’t planning (or hoping) for any big callout at this point in time as I’ve kept it a bit under the radar for quite some time… but it is what it is. I decided to go “public” on Eric’s blog because it was just too good of a conversation that had already been started.

    It is what it is!

    :)

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    • If I didn’t do it, someone else would have. It’s not a full page spread but it’s relevant to the post so I figured I’d at least mention it. At the very least, those interested will sign up to the email list.

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      • ah, don’t take this the wrong way, i’m happy for it.. perhaps when it’s getting closer to release we can do a bigger discussion and post. :P

        thanks jeff!

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  8. I use Windows Live Writer for authoring content, whether offline or at my desk. I originally started using it because I contributed to blogs on a number of different platforms and it provided a common UI, but now I’m just used to it for my WordPress blogs. I typically share images from my Flickr account and use the Flickr Image Reference plug-in, which hasn’t been updated in ages and has a few small bugs, but works well enough. I would love to have something better for offline authoring on Android, I end up having to hand-code the HTML in the native WP app far too often.

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  9. I remember a few years back there was Zoundry Raven, that supported multiple platforms. I wonder whatever happened to it – their web site is up, but it doesn’t seem like anyone takes care of it any longer.

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  10. Yeah, I think it would be a good option to have, especially for new users or someone looking to change. Myself, I would probably continue with the status quo… doing my posts in the editor…my old dog instincts ;)

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  11. I think people here are implying that this needs to be some sort of desktop native app. But I assume Eric is intending this to be part of WordPress itself (I could be wrong though). So you’d just navigate to your admin panel when offline, and it would still work via the browsers offline caching systems. I’ve messed around with this stuff in the past, as I was trying to make a plugin which would allow WordPress sites to work even when offline (albeit I wasn’t intending to tackle the admin panel), but I gave up due to offline storage being buggy in all the browsers I tested. That was quite a while ago though, so hopefully browsers have caught up a little now. I did have a working prototype of that system running (for the front-end), but it bugged out so many times that it became highly annoying. Sometimes you would navigate to the site and find that half your assets were non-existent, or web pages which had been updated would serve the stale cache despite being refreshed (due to browser bugs, not bugs created by me :P).

    EDIT: I should have read Eric’s post more thoroughly. He covered this scenario in the comments by saying that it would be fraught with issues due to lack of browser support.

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  12. I don’t know if the feature is still around since I NEVER used it, isn’t there an e-mail your post option? You email [email protected] and it gets published in default category?

    How would the offline post making thing handle media?

    There are people who pay for internet in hourly basis. So I do see advantage of offline post creation, type it on your laptop, go to internet cafe/dial up/whatever and then send it up to your site.

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  13. I have only been using WordPress for 8 months while blogging about our sailing trip, so I have minimal technical expertise. An offline component would be amazingly helpful because the internet is spotty and slow in the islands. RIght now, I draft my text in Word and gather my photos by compressing and exporting them from iPhoto into another file for uploading. I feel like I am doing every step twice. It takes a long time to upload and do final edits in WordPress for text and photo selection.

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  14. MarsEdit for Mac works well for writing posts off line and pushing them live when you’re ready. It syncs multiple blogs, uploads media files from your computer or Flickr, handles tags, categories, post-status, etc. You can also set up stylesheets to see what your post will look like in the wild.

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  15. I would unquestionably use the offline wordpress app. I often find myself in areas of the mountains with weak or no internet connection. With laptop or notebook the opportunity to complete work offline would be invaluable (and with power outs).

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  16. I use mail via the JetPack plugin to submit drafts of content – which is very convenient because I live out of my inbox. Response from clients on using this option have also been very positive because of the very low user threshold. Everybody can send an email.

    I have also used MS Word, which support the XML-RPC interface for multiple accounts. Clients have been positive about this option as well. It’s an environment they are familiar with, which makes all the difference.

    Lately, I have been using Evernote more and more – and the ability to publish via mail from a note in Evernote is nice. The advert in the bottom of the mail is annoying, but is easily removed before publishing in WordPress after adjusting some SEO, social media distribution and other items. Evernote handles both online and offline editing through syncing, which is close to your specifications.

    There used to be a plugin called EverPress – to autopost from a shared notebook in Evernote. But it seems it is no longer maintained. Perhaps this could be a viable alternative – to update this plugin?

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  17. I have used the WordPress apps for both my iPhone and iPad happly for offline posts, but I admit that sometimes there is nothing better then having a full keyboard to work on. For a period of time I was using MS Word for offline post, but it never failed that I would have to go back and reedit the post once I would publish it.

    If someone came up with a good way to post when offline, I would be all over it.

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  18. HI Jeff,

    I”ve been working with similar ideas using Angularjs with WordPress and Zurb foundation. I developed a theme that turns wordpress into a Single Page Application.

    https://github.com/HRoger/angularpresstheme

    demo: http://angularpresstheme.com/

    I would like to implement an angularjs offline editor for the backend and frontend (see my todo list on github) using John Papa’s concept of Progressive Saving (or Work in Progress)

    module:http://www.johnpapa.net/wp-content/sites/ngzWIP/readme/readme.html
    demo: http://cc-ng-z.azurewebsites.net/#/sessions
    video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLij19xbefI

    Hope you like it.

    Best regards,

    Roger

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  19. This is something I’ve been looking for for many years now. It would certainly improve my content production.

    So far I have tried Mars Edit, and it works. But the app is $40 once your trial exprires.

    Then there’s Ulysses III who recently announced they will be adding blogging support. http://ulyssesapp.com/devblog/2014/01/23/this-ones-for-the-bloggers-announcing-ulysses-1-2/ The app is priced similarly.

    I’d love to see a native Mac app that lets your write while keeping your content synched between online/offline. Performance is key here for me, as I have to managed thousands of articles and hundreds of drafts.

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  20. Please, please, please somebody develop a true offline WordPress app! Would be worth it’s weight in gold! I spend way too much time composing in Word, then copying, pasting and fumbling around with media when I am offline for extended periods of time.
    I want to focus on the content of my BLOGs not technical folderol!

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  21. brutalpixie

    For those who use WP as a CMS it would be invaluable to have a central respository/offline component that syncs when connected and updates content throughout a website. It’s the future of content management and content re-use and if you could do that with WP, it would be amazing.

    Reply

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