23 Comments


  1. Ha! I’ve seen the Omega button in the visual editor but I don’t think I’ve ever clicked it. So THAT’s what it’s for. All this time, I’ve been going to Google, searching for the word with the special characters and just copy pasting it into the editor. For example, Déjà Vu. Considering I rarely write anything using those special characters, I’ll probably never use it.

    Also, since I’m trained to just go to Google first, I’d probably end up doing that instead of using this area of the editor out of habit. Since it’s only available in the visual editor, I don’t mind if it stays for those that use it.

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    • That’s exactly what I do Jeff – only takes a few mins and of course you can do it in the text editor.

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  2. I haven’t used the visual editor in years, and back when I was learning WP, I was too busy figuring out how everything else worked via the Codex to really bother with such a “detail” in the editor. I had noticed it way back when, but it’s been long-forgotten about until reading this post.

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  3. That’s a component of TinyMCE. I wouldn’t agree with removing it as I consider special characters to be a necessary part of word processing.

    I wasn’t aware that it was a standard part of the editor though, I already use a plugin to customize the visual editor to make it more similar to standard word processing tools.

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  4. You never finish learning. Good to know, it’s incredible how many people never noticed or never even tried to click that button. I’ve never needed it but now that I know I’ll avoid googling to find this information

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  5. LOL! looks like i’ve been the only person who’s been using this feature :) Its a handy little button and yup… something that keeps me away from Googling.

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  6. You rightly said – the special character button was within the kitchen sink of the visual editor so it was left undiscovered. WordPress has many times surprised me with it usability.

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  7. I doubt I’ll remember this is there. I’ll probably still resort to Googling or fumbling key combinations until I find what I want :P

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  8. barni87

    Wow! I’ve been looking for this and always route to Google until today because most of the WordPress book I have didn’t share this functionality. It should be let a lone please!!! Thanks for the exposure Sarah and happy val in advnc…

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  9. 4 years with WordPress, not knowing it until now. If it’s light, then it should remain as a WP core.

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  10. I knew it already but never wrote any post. I thought everyone knows it just like in a word processor. ;)

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  11. Juan Padial

    It is not a feature of WordPress, it is an standard TinyMCE feature. I use it near everyday.

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    • I always disable the visual editor just in case I hit it by mistake and it messes up the html formating

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      • I’m with Keith and many of the others above: the sad thing about WordPress is how careful you have to be to NEVER hit “Visual Editor” since it will mess up your page. I do need to type special characters fairly often and this would be easier than looking them up every time, but only if there was a way to access it from the Text/Markdown editor.

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  12. I use the Omega button all the time. I know a few of the keyboard characters without the visual editor but it definitely helps for those I don’t know or have forgotten. Terrible idea to remove it because some people don’t require it.

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  13. We definitely call attention to this feature in training calls with our clients. Our client base has a high propensity for obtaining awards and designations, most of which require the trademark or registered copyright symbol. Additionally, our client base can’t be expected to know alt codes or keyboard shortcuts and we want to make the content editing process as smooth for them as possible.

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    • That’s an interesting use case and one I wouldn’t have thought of. Indeed, just selecting the icon is much better than memorizing those pesky ALT codes.

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  14. I use it often, and better it remains than needing another bloated plugin that never gets updated, or becomes another source of leaks.

    Thing is, just because some ‘purists’ don’t use it, or don’t even bother with the visual editor, the number of non coders, non purists, that use WordPress do use these things, when they find them.

    And anything that keeps me away from using Google, is a good thing.

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  15. Use Special html codes all the time. Using a number of diffrent languages at one time. nice to know special html code is hidden in wp some were.

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