11 Comments


  1. Who wouldn’t want to invest in Automattic? Seems like a no-brainer to me. I hope it was made clear to investors that they are investing in Automattic, WP.com and their associated products, not the software that powers 22% of the web.

    The question on the minds of many is when will the company go public, if at all?

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    1. Hi Sarah and Jeff

      “I hope it was made clear to investors that they are investing in Automattic, WP.com and their associated products, not the software that powers 22% of the web.”

      You know I assumed that we were talking wordpress.org here but obviously not.

      Is it wordpress.com that makes the money and wordpress.org that we bloggers and businesses use?

      Confused of Solihull in the UK?

      Reply

      1. Pretty much.

        There is the WordPress foundation which is a non profit organization that furthers the mission of the open source project known as WordPress http://wordpressfoundation.org/

        Then, there is the self-hosted, open source, project known as WordPress. It’s what you download and install on webhosts from WordPress.org.

        Then there is WordPress.com, a service owned and operated by Automattic of which Matt Mullenweg is the CEO. WordPress.com earns revenue primarily from upgrades users can purchase to enhance their blogs. As a company, Automattic earns revenue from their services, VIP platform, and a very small amount through advertising.

        Matt Mullenweg is the co-creator of the open source project known as WordPress, CEO of Automattic which operates WordPress.com, and chief board member of the WordPress Foundation. Every now and then, he leads a release of WordPress.

        As you can see, Matt wears many hats and in my opinion, has done a very good job of balancing each out separately to avoid controversy.

        This explanation may or may not have helped you but at the very least, you can see why there is so much confusion. It’s not hard to figure out who’s who but it sure is hard to remember.

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        1. I loved Matt’s vision and mission “Democratizing Publishing”. Kinda placed us into 21st e-century crusaders! I’ve heard little about Mark Little the co-founder of WordPress.

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  2. Wow! Jeff makes a good point — Automattic, wp.com and their associated products are separate from WordPress.

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    1. “Automattic, wp.com and their associated products are separate from WordPress.”

      Now I really am confused.

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      1. When I say associated products, I’m referring to IntenseDebate, PostKit, PollDaddy, anything officially under the Automattic umbrella.

        Reply

  3. LOL @ the irony of an article that exudes a sense of pride by proxy in a brand that apparently is very successful raising money among investors but leaves a wake of confusion precisely among those who use the product most intensively and therefore logically assumed they understand it better than most.

    It certainly spawns an interesting reflection, on the finer points of brand management and user experience management, and how mastery of one one isn’t necessarily the same as excellence in the other.

    Either way, yay Matt! He’s doing a phenomenal job. I often refer to him as the open software community’s own Steve Jobs. And that is really meant as a compliment.

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  4. eherman24

    Best of luck to Automattic! What a truly amazing company.

    Now, If only I had the capital to be an investor…

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    Reply

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