New Ebook Released For WP Multisite

Sometimes, the most difficult task at hand when operating a website is locating the documentation that helps solve a problem. For those of you who have been looking for a WordPress Multisite reference book to help get you started, Mika Epstein and Andrea Rennick have co-authored a book specifically for WordPress Multisite. The book contains over 40 pages of information ranging from installation to configuration. However, one of the more interesting aspects of the book is that the price tag is PWYW otherwise known as Pay What You Want. Mika suggests $5.00 but it’s not a mandatory amount. Since Sunday, she has seen over 500 downloads of the book while earning $150.00. With that said, the book has been released under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial license which basically means you can use it on your website, put it within the Codex, give it away to someone, but what you can’t do is make money from it. I encourage you to read her take on why she released the book as is.

I think one of the things worth taking away from this little experience is that code is GPL, text is not.

6 Comments


  1. Ah, on reading that post again I understand what you meant. The text on WordPress.org is creative commons licensed, and the code in WordPress core is GPL licensed. The way you wrote it implied that text can never be GPL licensed.

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  2. Ryan: It’s best to use the right license for the right purpose. The GPL is designed to be a license for code. It doesn’t make sense when interpreted for something like textual content, or images, or other types of creative works. For those, a different license might be more appropriate.

    Not that you can’t apply any license to any work, it’s just unclear as to intent in some cases. CC license are great for text/images/etc. They don’t make much sense for code though. A more code-specific license applies better in those cases.

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  3. Otto got what I meant. It’s not that code can’t be CC, or that text can’t, but you’re not getting any benefit from having text be GPL.

    Basically I got a dummy telling me ‘You put your ebook out in CC! That’s against GPL! You can’t do that!’ and, frankly, that’s poppycock. If there’d been any code, I would have specified that the code was GPL2 or later. As there was no code, the text was CC. IIRC, so is the codex and WordPress.com (I asked Matt in passing once).

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