10 Comments

  1. Pooja
    · Reply

    Great to see this Sarah.

    Can you also address the concern of many bloggers that Jetpack slows down the blog or page? I think this will clear many doubts of the readers.

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    • Jeremy
      · Reply

      Can you also address the concern of many bloggers that Jetpack slows down the blog or page? I think this will clear many doubts of the readers.

      Hi! I work on the Jetpack team, and I’d like to offer some information that will hopefully address your concerns.

      Jetpack is a big plugin. It offers a lot of features, and as a result I think it’s only natural for folks to worry about the impact such a plugin could have on their site. It’s definitely a great question to ask yourself when installing a new theme or plugin on your site. 👍

      The good news is, that’s something we in the Jetpack team take very seriously as well. In the past few years, we’ve continuously worked on improving the performance of every aspect of the plugin:

      We update existing features to improve their performance.
      We consider potential performance impacts whenever we develop and introduce new features.
      Some of the features we add to the plugin are directly meant to improve performance on your site. Our image, file, and video CDNs are there to help, alongside features like Lazy Loading for your images for example.

      In addition to the work we do within the plugin, we also rely on the WordPress.com cloud to improve your site’s performance. When you install Jetpack, you connect your site to WordPress.com. Once you’ve done that, some of the Jetpack features you’ll use will rely on the WordPress.com infrastructure. Instead of using your hosting plan’s resources, the plugin will rely on WordPress.com to do some of the heavy lifting on your site. Things like backups will be stored safely on our servers; Related Posts will be indexed and processed on our servers instead of on yours. You can then choose to rely on those features instead of using a plugin that would do the work on your own site. This will have a positive impact on your site’s performance.

      All that said, some of the work will also fall on you. You will decide what Jetpack features you want to enable on your site, and you’ll have to decide whether those features are worth the impact they may have on your site.
      Let’s look at some examples. Jetpack allows you to add several official sharing buttons at the bottom of all your posts, as well as widgets to display your latest Tweets, Instagram pictures, or posts on your Facebook Page. It also allows you to embed Instagram pictures or timelines within your posts, as discussed in the post above.
      Each one of those things can be useful, but can also have an impact on your site’s loading speed.
      It’s then up to you to decide whether you need all those sharing buttons, widgets, and embeds. You can give things a try, and adjust things as necessary.

      I hope this clarified things a bit. If you ever have any questions or concerns about Jetpack, don’t hesitate to reach out! We’re always happy to answer any questions you may have about the service.

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  2. Gary
    · Reply

    Awww, you didn’t publish this post to Twitter as a thread! 😄

    I’m glad to see you found the Twitter-related UI we added to the block editor useful: there was very much a focus on providing immediate feedback (so you can make quick edits specifically for Twitter), but to keep it as subtle as possible, so it didn’t get in the way of your writing. I really wanted to avoid a situation where tweets would be generated weirdly, it had to create something that read like a Twitter thread. Comparing the post I wrote to the thread it created, you can see some of that in action: long paragraphs are split up at sentence breaks, consecutive short paragraphs are merged into a single tweet where possible, headings cause a new tweet to start, and it generally tries to apply Twitter conventions to how everything is formatted.

    There’s a lot more that could be done with this feature, but I think it’s ready for folks to start using, and we can iterate on it based on wider feedback. I do have one request for now, though: if there are plugin devs who’ve made blocks that they think would translate well to the Twitter format, I’d love to see some examples, as adding plugin support is high on my TODO list. 🙂

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  3. DJ Johnny Medley
    · Reply

    Awesome article! On a related tangent, the video hosting in Jetpack is excellent, yet rarely gets discussed. We’re using Jetpack Premium, which comes with Pressable’s hosting plan. I can’t rave about Pressable enough! WordPress-4-Life! :)

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  4. Nur Islam
    · Reply

    Jetpack already have some great feature and it is adding more features regularly.
    Don’t know why people have too much negative idea on Jetpack.

    Like I use this on my blog from the beginning and I am enjoying this.
    Waiting for this new feature…

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  5. visitor
    · Reply

    Hi there! This is an insteresting feature!!

    However I still can’t find if possible to change the place where the tweet breaks and where could I modify o translate the “This thread can be read here” text of the last tweet..

    Other than that, excellent tool!

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    • Jeremy
      · Reply

      I still can’t find if possible to change the place where the tweet breaks

      You can use blocks for that. If you want a paragraph of text to be separated into multiple tweets, split that paragraph into two by adding a heading block between 2 pieces of text, for example.

      where could I modify o translate the “This thread can be read here” text of the last tweet..

      You can offer translations for this string (and others) here:https://translate.wordpress.com/projects/wpcom/

      Once your suggestion is approved, it will be immediately available to anyone using WordPress and Jetpack in your language.

      Report

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