11 Comments

  1. Sam Hotchkiss

    Great Post!

    I would encourage everyone who is a part of the US WordPress community to get out and experience some of the more “off the beaten path” international WordCamps (go to camps other then London, EU, etc). I went to WC Poland last year, and am in Mumbai now for their WordCamp this weekend, and, IMO, these are the most insightful and inspiring events you can attend.

    The future growth of WordPress depends on international communities, and it is amazing to travel the world connecting with people whose livelihoods all depend on the same open source project that yours does.

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    • Miroslav Glavić

      how do you overcome the language barrier? What if you don’t speak the local language? I am going to assume WordCamps are done in their local language? Like WordCamps in France/Croatia/Germany/Serbia are going to be done in French/Croatian/German/Serbian. I only speak 3 languages (English, Croatian, Spanish).

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      • Sam Hotchkiss

        Good question! I only speak English (and a little bit of Spanish), but I’ve found that most WordCamps will at least have some sessions in English, if not an entire track. While WordPress is an international product, most of the communication around working on core and building sites/plugins/themes happens in English.

        In most of Europe, as you know, most younger people speak English, as it’s a common language between countries (sorry, Esperanto). This is less common in South America and East Asia (I’m told, haven’t been yet). Here in India, everyone speaks English, and many of them speak it better than I do :)

        I’ve never had a problem traveling places where English isn’t the primary language– a smile and some body language can go a long way to bridging the language gap.

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  2. Juanfra Aldasoro

    Great post Jeff! It’s nice to hear our story was appreciated. In addition, I would like to say that we’ve achieved the goal of having a WordCamp for this 2015, after 5 years of silence :)

    If anybody is interested in our event, you can get the updates on: http://buenosaires.wordcamp.org and @WordCampBsAs

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  3. mikeschinkel

    “Organizing a meetup is one of the hardest things to do in terms of contributing to WordPress. Every single month, you have to come up with new stuff.”

    Matt certainly has that correct!

    http://www.meetup.com/atlanta-wordpress-coders-guild/

    What’s especially hard is asking members when is a good time and what locations are good for them and only hearing crickets from most members. That is until after we schedule a meetup and then they complain that it’s a bad day/date-time/location. ;-)

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    • Andy Christian

      I’ve seen groups have better luck picking a day/week of the month (3rd Tuesday, for example) and ALWAYS sticking to that day. It takes a little while, but eventually people start scheduling other things around your meetup, rather than complaining that your meetup interferes with their other plans.

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      • mikeschinkel

        I’ve seen groups have better luck picking a day/week of the month (3rd Tuesday, for example) and ALWAYS sticking to that day.

        Yep, best practice #25 of 25:

        http://mikeschinkel.com/blog/25-best-practices-for-meetup-organizers/

        However, I’m working this one a little differently. We’ve got a very focused meetup (only coders and wanna-be coders, no end-users) and I’m trying to get everyone who is interested in the meetup engaged; setting a day/week of the month will necessarily ensure that certain people will never attend. And that’s what I’m trying to avoid.

        but eventually people start scheduling other things around your meetup, rather than complaining that your meetup interferes with their other plans.

        In my experience running meetups having organized well over 50 meetup since 2007 there are things that simply cannot be scheduled around; for example other meetups that pick the same day/week of the month but that have higher priority in the minds of some members. Or family obligations. Or school courses. Or yoga classes, et, al.

        So I am aware it’s a lot more work to not set a consistent day/week of the month but our objectives require it. Doesn’t mean I can’t vent about human nature though. :)

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  4. Tom Zsomborgi (@tomzur)

    Hi Jeff,

    Thank you very much for featuring this guide glad that you like it. So good to see that WordPress is truly global and internationale. You can find active WP communities all around the world from South America to Asia.

    Thank you once again for the contributors, this would’t be possible without their help.

    Cheers,
    To from Kinsta

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