11 Comments

  1. Nick Diego
    · Reply

    I am pretty sure you can limit the number of posts using the little icon in the Query toolbar. Took me a bit to find it myself. It is the one that looks like three little sliders on the parent Query block.

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  2. Anne McCarthy
    · Reply

    Your description of getting bored midway through testing brought a good laugh :D Thanks for pushing through the boredom, testing, and making it your own. I was hoping this prompt might allow people to both go deep in a creation process to build the perfect sidebar and only quickly test if they were low on time.

    When trying to figure out what to test next, I had a similar experience of needing at least an hour to create something I was relatively happy with. While it’s neat to have more options to explore and build, there’s definitely a level of refinement still needed as right now the customizations options are wide open. This is intentional and is part of what’s being worked on right now. I really like what you made for what it’s worth!

    I passed along your feedback directly to some of the folks who worked on the TT1 theme. Thanks for your honesty there. I like to say “thanks for making me better” when I get feedback that’s hard to hear.

    The preview problem is something I saw with the first round for testing and expect to see with this one too. I put your feedback in this related GitHub issue for future reference: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/28208#issuecomment-785450333

    In today’s Core Editor chat, Riad touched on the width issue as something he wants to turn his attention to for FSE: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2021/02/24/editor-chat-summary-24-february-2021/ “For example, the wide/full flags we have for the post content editor are optimized for the post content and for backward compatibility but these notions don’t translate properly to a fully editable theme.” Ultimately, Gutenberg provides all the spacing so there’s little themes can do here right now. I regularly run into this with my own testing so appreciate this being touched on here. I just followed up with Riad to make sure there are open issues/PRs to capture this.

    As for the “Add Block Icon” feedback, I’ve added it to this overall issue that highlights many of the pain points with the current setup and included a video of my own experience: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/26404#issuecomment-785461564

    You mentioned that the settings didn’t stick when you’re using the Top Toolbar but I wasn’t able to replicate that when just using WordPress 5.6.2 without any additional plugins installed. I was able to turn that preference on, publish a post, navigate to wp-admin, and start a new post with the preference saved.

    As I mentioned in my comment above, the Query block is meant more for theme authors than users and purposefully wasn’t a main focus of this testing call to prevent confusion. Most end users will interact with block variations (like Posts Lists in this test). Stay tuned for a dedicated call for testing though as I think it’s important to get a refined experience with that powerful block and the resulting variations, patterns, settings, etc.

    Finally, to keep it brief, your feedback about the featured image block is so on point. I’ve included it in an issue about the block itself and various cropping options: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/27620#issuecomment-785461448

    Thanks again for testing and for making FSE better. In the chaos of 2020/2021, I don’t take it for granted that people take time to explore and share their honest thoughts. As I said earlier, it’s the only way we’ll get better.

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  3. Jeff Ong
    · Reply

    Great feedback, thank you for taking the time to test and share your insights with everyone.

    The theme does not reliably handle the multitude of possibilities the site editor sets in the hands of end-users. This entire experience could be made smoother with a better theme.

    It’s true that the theme could include more CSS to dictate aspects like spacing and smooth over visual inconsistencies.

    I will say the approach for developing TT1 blocks is different than how a classic theme provides support for Gutenberg. Where a classic theme would express all of its style opinions via targeted CSS, contributors to TT1 Blocks are trying to express the theme’s style opinions solely via block templates and the global styles / theme.json mechanism. Anything that cannot be expressed this way, rather than writing a patch for it in the theme CSS, is viewed as an opportunity to improve the site editor and global styles.

    This results in a theme that looks broken in places, and that’s intentional for now to make the gaps obvious. That way the team can identify those gaps, and open issues + PRs to address them upstream in Gutenberg where the benefits will scale. Many of these issues are in progress or blocked: https://github.com/WordPress/theme-experiments/projects/1#column-12084948

    The hope is doing it this way will lead to a better and more consistent experience in the long term. Would love your thoughts on this approach, and thanks again for your generosity in testing and sharing feedback :)

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  4. Enea Overclokk
    · Reply

    The first time I tried the query block I was lucky because I immediately found the button for switching query from URL to custom settings, one thing it’s weird for me is the setting splitted in the block inspector and in the toolbar menu.

    I also created a video where I build the home page with FSE, it’s in italian language, I’m sorry, but if you want you can see it in mute mode and 2x speed here the link https://youtu.be/q7Q0FZnSCSQ

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