6 Comments

  1. Ted Magwell
    · Reply

    As an owner of a few open-source tools, it scares me that some large’ish company will come one day and just fork it. Makes me want to change a license to a much stricter one.

    Report

  2. Li-An
    · Reply

    Thanks for the story. I’m often horrified by the evolution of WP as money maker and it’s not very reassuring to see where WooC comes from. But it’s quite a good story to tell 🙂

    Report

  3. Ian Ansdell
    · Reply

    A really valuable piece, Sarah. It’s so ironic that if this were a print-age story the evidence would still be around in corporate reports and trade press stories. Now, so much history is disappearing almost as soon as it’s made. If the Internet Archive ever goes, we’ll be in real trouble.

    Report

  4. Liam
    · Reply

    I started off with jigoshop beta back in May 2011, I used to love checking out thier new shop plugins every Tuesday and picking up a couple and spent hundreds getting custom plugins made. One being a delivery plugin that I had converted to woo and still lives on today with my local pizzeria – thanks jigoshop team!

    Report

  5. Christina Warren
    · Reply

    It’s so funny to read back about the past drama with the WooCommerce forking. I commented a few times in the linked WPCandy piece, being one of the few defenders of the fork (which was completely ethical and allowed under the license and the decision of the employees who made the decision to take new jobs), and I completely agree with everything I wrote then (which isn’t always the case after ten years).

    When you look at the massive success of WooCommerce and its place not just in the WordPress ecosystem but in e-commerce platforms, it is clear that forking and hiring Mike and Jay was the right move. And as Mike said in his interview, it definitely feels “inevitable.”

    Jigoshop didn’t see the plugin as a real focus area by Mike’s own admission, and Woo did. And that makes so much of the difference.

    It’s hard to think of another plugin that has had the impact or success of WooCommerce. Honestly, $20m for WooThemes was a tremendous exit, but six years later, looking at the valuation of Shopify and others, a hosted WooCommerce—as-a-Service offering could be worth much more. I think we’re all lucky it is part of the Automattic umbrella.

    As I said way back then, it is totally reasonable for the Jigoshop team to have felt burned and to be upset by what transpired, but this is how the real world works. I think back to those days when so many people in the so-called “community” (including a person who later went on to scam the community himself) were so critical of such an essential part of open source software, and I wonder if their position has changed. And if it hasn’t, I guess I still wonder why they bother with OSS stuff to begin with.

    In any event, happy anniversary to WooCommerce.

    Report

  6. CW
    · Reply

    Thanks for the great coverage, Sarah.

    While I think the fork is pretty ethically questionable, I doubt Jigoshop would have ever reached the popularity of WooCommerce had it not been forked. I remember looking through ecommerce plugins only a little while after the fork happened, and the Jigoshop code and WooCommerce code looked almost identical to me except for one important difference – WooCommerce had added a bunch of hooks and filters to make their plugin extensible, whereas Jigoshop had not bothered with that small step. I chose WooCommerce for that reason, and obviously I’m glad I did.

    Report

Leave a Reply to Liam Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: