30 Comments

  1. Stephen Vaughan
    · Reply

    Must give the plugin a go. What would be useful, not sure it was mentioned, is when the photo is added, the photographer accreditation is added as well.

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  2. Sukalyan Mukharjee
    · Reply

    Interesting. Will this automatically add any link to the photo’s owner? Or unintended link to unsplash itself?

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    • Ali
      · Reply

      Hey Sukalyan!
      The plugin does automatically insert the attribution and alt description, however, the user can delete it if they want too.

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  3. Olarewaju Blessing
    · Reply

    This is a great development. It is time consuming to go to Unsplash to get a photo and back to WordPress editor. I’m definitely getting the plugin.

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  4. NotSoImportant
    · Reply

    “The selected images are download and added to the WordPress media library, saving users the trouble of having to leave their dashboards to search, download, and upload images.”

    https://unsplash.com/license
    “Photos cannot be sold or redistributed without significant modification.”

    If the images are downloaded and put in the media library for you to use (in posts for example), then you’re basically redistributing them.

    Also, the license as a whole is against the GPL.

    Promoting this plugin and hosting it on wp.org shouldn’t have happened, even if it’s just a service gateway.

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    • Luke
      · Reply

      Nothing about this plugin is incompatible with the Unsplash License — you can see that we’ve been working with companies and developers to build thousands of similar integrations across Medium, Ghost, Buzzfeed, Squarespace, etc. for years and there have been zero problems. The issue you’re thinking of refers back to recompiling the library to create a competing service which isn’t the intention of any reasonable person using Unsplash or this plugin.

      Re GPL, content doesn’t have to be GPL compatible to be used in WordPress. Hence why you have plugins for Youtube, Twitter, etc. and you can upload your own imagery + post your own content (99.9999% of which is distributed under a much more restrictive license). The Unsplash License allows creators to use the images to create things freely, which is what we and our community promote.

      For more, you can checkout FAQS at https://help.unsplash.com/en/collections/1463188-unsplash-license

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  5. Ari
    · Reply

    The irony here is that this goes against Unsplash’s own licensing for images. It’s vague and restrictive to the point where one doesn’t even know if they can actually use the images they import

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  6. Goutam Das
    · Reply

    It would be Great if Unsplash add an option to compress the pictures as most of the pictures are around 2-3 MB.
    Am I right?

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    • Luke
      · Reply

      Hey Goutam,

      The plugin automatically compresses the images using our dynamic CDN. It inserts multiple versions of the image and uses srcset so that the browser chooses the right size.

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      • Matt Mullenweg
        · Reply

        What tracking or logging is done when someone chooses to use this CDN? It must be expensive to provide, so it’s unclear “why” you want people to use that versus uploading to their site.

        Could the terms or licensing of that hotlinking change in the future, as the licensing did in 2017?

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        • William Patton
          · Reply

          I’d say it’s highly likely that terms will change. It seems as though the licence was literally changed in the previous 24 hours…

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          • Luke
            · Reply

            @william You’re right that there was a change to the license page design yesterday, but I want to be clear that the license definition has stayed the same since the 2017 clarification. The license is defined as the actual legal definition of the license + the terms, and those have remained the exact same since the first few weeks of Unsplash being created back in 2013.

            We had updated the design of the license page about a month ago to include a an extra bullet point ‘do this, don’t do that’ list next to the legal definition of the license. The purpose of this wasn’t to introduce any new legal points, but to test a simplified presentation of the license next to the legal definition of the license.

            When doing this, we had used the word ‘redistribute’ in one the ‘don’t do this’ bullet points instead of the word ‘recompile’, and this had been missed by our review team before being shipped. When this was pointed out to us yesterday, we removed the word ‘redistribute’ as the word redistribute is not the correct word to describe the restriction. Mistakes happen — we’re a small team — there is no mal intent here. It was a mistake that was caught yesterday and corrected.

            Re logging or tracking, we record a ‘view’ for the photo to increment the view count information for our contributors stats. This is common practice. We do this on all 2,200+ of the other API integrations using Unsplash, including Buzzfeed, Medium, Wix, Squarespace, Dropbox, Figma, Sketch, Ghost, Framer, and Notion, and we’ve been doing this for 8+ years.

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            • William Patton
              · Reply

              That is good to know that the wording there was a mistake. Happy that it has been resolved and at this point I, personally, feel like what the licence states and how the plugin works is perfectly valid. Thank you for taking the concerns seriously :)

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  7. Kingsley Felix
    · Reply

    Are the images getting attached to the article is was uploaded to? Because the jetpack pexel feature does not attach the images to the article, they show up as unattached.

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  8. Rohit modak
    · Reply

    Awesome all of my blogging career i have been downloading those good unsplash pic and then again uploading back in WordPress. This plugin is a time saver for real.

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  9. Bianca
    · Reply

    Interesting to see how this plugin is different from the Instant Images Plugin that has already been a while in the rep.

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  10. Mohamed Oka
    · Reply

    This is really awesome plugin that saves tones of work when it comes to adding pictures to your posts with seo and speed optimized.. Willl add it to my dafult list of wp plugins

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  11. Melissa
    · Reply

    Not surprised to see Unsplash develop their own ‘official’ plugin for the repo. Unfortunately I don’t see this as a good thing, but actually the opposite.

    They can now force user sign ups to inflate their user base even though other plugins just serve images without any sort of authentication. What is the point in a user authenticating to only receive an API key? It’s not like you can access Likes or your collection with only the API key.

    Serving images from their CDN also allows them to track image views and URLs which helps inflate the download and view counts for their contributors. These other plugins like Instant Images downloads the file to your media library which would only count as a single download.

    I’m going to stick with Instant Images as I don’t feel like feeding the advertising machine.

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    • Scott Pruett
      · Reply

      Like it or not, the advertising machine is what keeps Unsplash in business.

      And try it out… it does add images to the Media Library.

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    • Derek Herman
      · Reply

      The other plugins are violating the Unsplash API terms of service. Signing up for an account is very simple and can be done in the authentication flow with your name and email, or even a couple social OAuth providers like Facebook.

      In a discussion about licensing I would think this point is extremely important. You cannot use the API the way those plugins currently are. However, Unsplash has not taken any action against those plugins to my knowledge. There is a lot of goodwill on their part to let the community make their own choice to do it the right and legal way.

      As for the CDN, it tracks views so the really lovely people who upload their images, that you get to download for free, can know how popular those images are. I think that’s fair. As well, the images are all downloaded to the media library and the CDN is actually filtering the local URL to render the assets from a free service that would normally cost you money. You are getting a free global CDN with edge caching. That’s pretty nice of them, all they ask in return is to know how many times it’s been downloaded and viewed while also being fully GDPR compliant.

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    • Luke
      · Reply

      Hey Melissa,

      I understand how on the surface it can seem like the requirement for each install of the plugin to be authenticated via an Unsplash account can seem like there’s something sketchy going on, but I can assure you that it comes from a real engineering and security requirement.

      We gain nothing from ‘inflating’ signup metrics — if you’ve ever used unsplash.com, you can see that we don’t care about requiring anyone to signup, as you’re not auth walled from any popular features like searching or downloading.

      As you know, WordPress uses decentralized installs — unlike lets say Trello, where there’s a single centralized application. The developers at Trello can use a single API key for all of their users because the key is hidden behind the Trello servers and can’t be exposed to any of the Trello users.

      Each installation of WordPress uses its own servers and therefore needs access to its own API key. If every WordPress install were to share the same API key, then there would be no point in having API keys at all, as anyone would be able to open up the Unsplash plugin, read the code and take the API key, and then use the API key for any application they want. Our team then can’t protect the service of the API from spammers and DDOS attacks (two very real things we deal with every day) because we can’t identify requests to the API by their API key.

      Every WordPress install therefore connects to Unsplash to create an API key that is used for that install, so that if the API key starts to do suspicious things, we can notify the owner and resolve the issue without taking down other legitimate uses. This is common practice in any API.

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  12. Jacob Jack
    · Reply

    One of the few good things to come out of 2020 so far! Great article!

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  13. Calvyn Lee
    · Reply

    next I believe pixabay and pexels will follow

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