25 Comments

  1. Alain Aubry
    · Reply

    “Automattic wants to put their funds toward native Gutenberg projects” …
    “Pods is a project that spans beyond Gutenberg.”

    This is the first head to roll.

    Sorry for Pods, I hope they can manage enough donations. I don’t use Pods but anyway I just send them a small one-time donation, purely symbolic.

    So we are going to be forced to use GB sooner or later.
    They decided this, so it be.

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    • Scott Kingsley Clark
      · Reply

      Thanks for your donation Alain! We plan on supporting Gutenberg interfaces as well as Classic interfaces long term. Our userbase is very heavy into the Classic editor interfaces for data management (us too), so we’re committed to keeping support for both long term.

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  2. T Piwowar
    · Reply

    Will Gutenberg be what ends WP’s explosive growth? Needless added complexity for a webmaster to struggle with. Don’t need it. Don’t want it. WP needs lots of tuning up in many places. Even WP’s previous shiny object, Customizer, languishes in a half-finished state. Gutenberg sucks all the oxygen out of development. Woe is us.

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    • Justin Tadlock
      · Reply

      The number of developers contributing to the WordPress project has increased since the integration of Gutenberg. Major plugin developers have adopted the block editor and are building interesting things with it. Right now, the signs point to Gutenberg being a boon to development. Maybe I’m a bit of an optimist, but I don’t see the project being detrimental to future growth.

      As the project continues, it has the potential for massive growth in development activity if core can finally solve the Fields API question. What I mean by this is Gutenberg could standardize how developers build anything within WordPress. Competing APIs have been a large hurdle for developers over the years. And, Gutenberg added another. The question is whether everything will eventually coalesce into a standardized API for any admin screen.

      Personally, I would have rather seen this happen before Gutenberg, but the idea never gained enough traction on its own.

      As for the customizer, I’m not sure what major features it is missing. However, I could see it falling to the wayside as we move into full-site editing via the Gutenberg project. Or, the two APIs melding in some way. It’s hard to say at this point.

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  3. Eric Adams
    · Reply

    This is terrible news. I hope they can find a way to make the project sustainable. It’s the best option for this type of functionality in my opinion after having tried all the others. I have donated in the past and will again. I will also try to raise awareness to this and get some more donations if possible. I honestly think they should consider a paid option if that’s what it take to move forward. Without this plugin, WordPress would be considerably less useful to me.

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  4. David LeBlanc
    · Reply

    My first thought was setting it up as freemium plugin, something like $29.00/year for the paid features, includes unlimited license, support and upgrades.

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  5. Anh Tran
    · Reply

    This is a bad news for an open-source project. As a developer who runs a similar product, I understand and completely agree with Clark. I hope the Pods team will have enough donors to keep the project alive.

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  6. Bastian
    · Reply

    Kudos to Scott for putting up with this without getting frustrated with the platform. First, it was the scrapping of the Fields API by the powers that be after working on it for years, and now, this.

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    • Rose Sebert
      · Reply

      it was the scrapping of the Fields API by the powers that be after working on it for years, and now, this.

      Do you have any proof that it was scrapped? From the make.wordpress.org/core posts, it more so looks like it was abandon by the team working on it.

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      • Scott Kingsley Clark
        · Reply

        Fields API was an effort I and a few developers put forward for a few years. We just couldn’t get traction or buy off from people who could put weight behind it. We built like 3 different versions of it based on feedback we received. Everyone thought it should be done a certain way and I couldn’t keep pouring my heart and soul into the project. Unfortunately Fields API was a distraction for me where I wasn’t able to do feature development for Pods for a bit (our other developer was focused on bug fix development).

        I tried to push Fields API forward many ways and I just couldn’t get enough traction. I ended up announcing my departure in the WordPress Fields API channel in July 2018 — https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C04MWK7PZ/p1532461483000439

        Automattic nor Matt Mullenweg directly put roadblocks in the way for Fields API, there were just other priorities like REST API and then Gutenberg.

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      • Bastian
        · Reply

        Not scrapped per se, it’s just that nobody in core cared about the project so it made no sense for him to continue working on it.

        It is with a heavy heart that I must pass the torch on this project. After hundreds of hours of my time, I no longer believe I can effect change within WordPress core.

        WordPress Core Fields API Project is Seeking New Leadership

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      • Wölie
        · Reply

        Listen to FAQ part of Matt State of the Word 2018. There he tells Scott that Fields API is not a thing to plan with..

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  7. The WP Girl
    · Reply

    I hope they get the funding needed. I am trying to spread the word on social media and I will donate when I can.

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  8. Peter Shaw
    · Reply

    Obviously Automattic is a private company and it is their money BUT this decision is mystifying. PODS is exactly the sort of project the WordPress community needs to support as it addresses many of the softwares shortcomings.

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    • Scott Kingsley Clark
      · Reply

      We will carry on, it was time for change and I’ve come to terms with the fact that it’s probably for the better. There’s a lot of cool stuff we can do and explore now, we have a bright future if we take the right steps here.

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  9. Joe Shift
    · Reply

    The path seems pretty clear if the team behind Pods wants it to continue: start charging and treat the product like a business instead of a hobby. It’s a subtle shift, but this puts the onus on the Pods team rather than the community (the latter of which is dangerously unpredictable, as this article points out).

    I’d buy a license because in that context I get something specific.

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  10. Dovy Paukstys
    · Reply

    Owner of Redux Framework here. I’m actually jealous you’ve had support from Automattic at all, we’ve had quite the cold shoulder despite our massive success.

    The donation route just doesn’t work. Not going to lie, it doesn’t. The developer market is poor. And it rotates so quickly it’s hard to get anything out of it.

    Take Redux for example; $56+ million in known revenue on Envato alone (https://redux.io/showcase/envato-market/), and less than $7,000 a year in donations and subscriptions combined. That is NOT sustainable. My suggestion, find a way to make a pro version and stop working on features for the base. Freemium is the only way to succeed in the WordPress market, especially when you have a developer-focused market.

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    • Scott Kingsley Clark
      · Reply

      Thanks for hitting me up on Slack, I really enjoyed our long conversation about our struggles in the ‘free’ market. I think it’s a HUGE shame that tens of millions of dollars go paid to developers who rely on your free project who then don’t help fund your project. It’s just crazy, those themers should set aside some % of all sales towards supporting the free projects they use. It’s in their own best interest long term!

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  11. Doug Smith
    · Reply

    I’ve fully embraced the Gutenberg editor and the users I work with all love it. They are able to quickly accomplish things on their own that they could not even do before. I would happily pay for better Pods integration with Gutenberg.

    Perhaps a fund-a-feature approach could help the project. Make a list of features small and large with a target dollar amount and let users vote with their wallets on what gets priority.

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    • Scott Kingsley Clark
      · Reply

      That’s one of the things we’re working on after we get this next release out the door. We’re looking at offering some features like more advanced Gutenberg stuff to our Friends of Pods at first, even if we eventually release them to the public on wordpress.org. There’s already a few add-ons we’re looking at offering to our Friends in 2020.

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