7 Comments

  1. Jamie
    · Reply

    Love Gutenberg when it’s finished. The UX for an editor is unparalleled.

    However, as a developer, it has been extremely hard to get into. I think that the documentation, while comprehensive, is not well mapped to the mental model of someone trying to learn how to create Gutenberg blocks. It’s a great reference point once you already know what you’re trying to do, but actually learning from the docs is extremely hard.

    I think the team writing the Gutenberg documentation should look to other good technical documentation for examples on how they could improve their own. A few well structured docs from the top of my head are:
    https://laravel.com/docs/8.x/lifecycle
    https://vuejs.org/v2/guide/
    https://reactjs.org/docs/getting-started.html

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  2. Steve Grant
    · Reply

    Regarding bringing developers on board. For me, I simply don’t have the time to delve into build steps and tool chains, and weird shifting APIs.
    My ideal methodology would be closer to what ACF Blocks offers, but with a client side render.

    I build sites for clients with bespoke plugins so that my clients get the unique system the need. I use WP as a platform because it used to be easy and fast to extend. Also, the code was easy to follow so whoever followed after me could maintain it easily. The platform was stable, so safe to build on. It was like granite bedrock.

    That’s not the way any more. It’s now complex, multi layered, time consuming, baffling, often changing methodologies from week to week. It’s like building on a flood plain.

    I understand the benefits for running a platform on JS on both the server and client side, that makes sense for code symmetry – but WP relies on PHP and will do for many years. We have lost simplicity and gained an awful complexity of intertwined systems. I now need both Node and a Local PHP server running. Its not simpler, and its not more elegant.

    I started off writing vanilla JS, but I’m really not in love with the modern JS toolchain, NPM based, huge libraries, build steps and transpilers. I find it a real unpleasant time consuming and unpredictable chore, confused, ugly, opaque, ever changing, demanding of maintenance. And the modern WP sits perched on that, with its own walls moving all the time.

    So, I now have to suffer a dev process I hate and build to a platform’s parameters which seem to change every month. Building a plug-in has gone from a conceptually simple process to one which is fraught with ever changing complexity.

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    • Gabriele
      · Reply

      That’s not the way any more. It’s now complex, multi layered, time consuming, baffling, often changing methodologies from week to week. It’s like building on a flood plain.

      Exactly this.

      I am pointing this out as a dangerous problem since first dev stages of Gutenberg but was always ridiculed, being told I would step in front of a train, be censored or not been allowed in comment areas, voted down into oblivion at reddit, etc. by people who obviously did not understand what the USP of WordPress was: Simplicity.

      More and more devs are leaving the WordPress ecosystem due to lost simplicity, some already sold out their million-use plugins, others are looking for buyers at the moment, that’s the huge elephant in the room which should be addressed by Tara and her team, good luck with that!

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    • RockyK
      · Reply

      I started off writing vanilla JS, but I’m really not in love with the modern JS toolchain, NPM based, huge libraries, build steps and transpilers. I find it a real unpleasant time consuming and unpredictable chore, confused, ugly, opaque, ever changing, demanding of maintenance. And the modern WP sits perched on that, with its own walls moving all the time.

      Having worked in PHP to build basic apps, I find JavaScript significantly more approachable. It has nothing to do with the language, but the community. Frankly, for every 100 online courses on Javascript, you’ll find one good PHP course. Good luck even finding new developers get excited about PHP, or even a bootcamp for PHP.

      And companies will find it a lot easier to find Javascript developers building WordPress apps rather than PHP developers.

      Is the future Javascript? According to the numbers, yes.

      Sorry if this isn’t the answer you want. But as you mentioned, ACF does have a neat set of tools to still use your PHP skillset to build Gutenberg blocks.

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    • Dominique Pijnenburg
      · Reply

      This is exactly what we experienced as well. Currently I’m looking into building headless WordPress sites with NextJS, because Full Site Editing just doesn’t cut it, in my opinion. But I’m interested to see what possibilities Full Site Editing will bring in the future.

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  3. Frank Schmitzke
    · Reply

    Maybe if we would stop releasing half baked features every few months and instead FIRST finish developing the product and THEN release it?

    Maybe that would help to get traction for the product once it is READY?

    Maybe that would be an idea?

    Guys?

    Since almost three years every wonky release damages trust in the product more and more, out there in third party dev and end user world, and out there is what matters in the end.

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  4. Videochat Brasov
    · Reply

    Hello!
    When I started working with the code the first language I used was HTML5 and CSS3. Now I’m working with PHP and JavaScript because I’ve started building projects in Joomla. At this point I can say that with Joomla 4 and the programmer knowledge that I have developed I can build any type of project

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