5 Comments

  1. Anne McCarthy
    · Reply

    While I sometimes need structure, I tend to break the rules anyway. The format of this test suited me well today.

    :D Love that there was finally an initiative with the program that gave you ample room to roam and to take advantage of that ability of yours. I dig how you approached this comparing across a few themes rather than just one switch. I didn’t want to ask for too much in the test but it’s a great way to wrap your head around the current state of things, including important topics like this:

    One question that keeps me up at night is how cross-theme compatibility will work on the content level. Default block output should translate from one theme to the next with little or no issues. However, custom block styles, font sizes, colors, and the full range of presets are already a problem area.

    This too is a great call out:

    While I called this the most complex piece of the design, it is actually a simple thing to do with most page builders or with a few lines of CSS.

    I’m going to follow up on this latter point to see if I might need to open an issue or if this is being thought about in a larger overview issue:

    However, I have not seen gradient names pop up in this discussion.

    If you don’t mind, I have a few questions I can’t help but ask:
    – Does being able to take different parts of different themes to create what you want feel enticing to you?
    – What prevented you from switching themes previously? Curious about this in general, especially in light of folks eventually hopefully switching to block themes in time.
    – Are there any tools outside of WordPress that you use that create a delightful experience when switching between something comparable to themes?

    No pressure to respond but had to ask :)

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    • Justin Tadlock
      · Reply

      Just running through these off the top of my head:

      – Does being able to take different parts of different themes to create what you want feel enticing to you?

      What might be interesting to me is pulling patterns from specific themes into others. When I think about patterns, though, I’m particularly interested in the layout of the blocks more so than the stylistic pieces. Those are easy to change. The more that we can have this sort of shared layout experience from theme to theme, the more mixing and matching we can do.

      It could also be awesome to pull a color palette and drop it into an existing theme. Sort of like having a Colour Lovers directory to pick color schemes from but keep all the other bits. This could be fun for people who can recognize a palette that they like but would never be able to handpick all those colors. I’ve often seen color schemes that I’d love to use from other themes but didn’t like other things about them.

      – What prevented you from switching themes previously? Curious about this in general, especially in light of folks eventually hopefully switching to block themes in time.

      Mostly just like to build my own thing.

      – Are there any tools outside of WordPress that you use that create a delightful experience when switching between something comparable to themes?

      Probably the closest things might be “skins” for various applications. For example, it is simple to load up a new color scheme for my text/code editor without changing anything else. That experience feels more like changing a WP admin color scheme than the front-end of a site.

      Outside of that, I can’t think of anything.

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  2. Anne McCarthy
    · Reply

    The open discussions on standardizing presets like font sizes and color names may bear fruit that could help with the more trivial parts. However, I have not seen gradient names pop up in this discussion.

    Of course as soon as I hit “Post Comment”, I remember this issue referenced by Rich in both posts you linked:

    https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/29568

    To me, gradients are well covered in this issue! Hopefully you agree but, if not, would love to hear more and open an issue if needed.

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    • Justin Tadlock
      · Reply

      They did come up in that issue, which I can see now that I’m re-reading it. However, I do not see what I might call “deep discussion” (for lack of a better phrase) specifically about them. Colors and font-sizes are lower hanging fruit, so it makes sense that most of the discussion centers on them. Plus, building a gradient CSS class and slug system is hard.

      Tailwind probably has the best class-based gradient solution I’ve seen (background image + color stop classes). I’m not sure if that’s a direction we could or even should go. Even if we did, we would need standardized color slugs first.

      Even the solution I’m currently using in my custom theme is something I’m unhappy with.

      I don’t think a separate issue is warranted yet. What comes out of that ticket may be just what we need or the starting point for the next step.

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  3. TS
    · Reply

    “While I called this the most complex piece of the design, it is actually a simple thing to do with most page builders or with a few lines of CSS.”

    Has anyone ever given a good explanation for why Gutenberg didn’t offer the option to adjust most CSS values of a box like other page editors and instead often opted for custom solutions to adjusments? At least as an option? I mean, it’s basically what editor plus does (which you celebrated a lot) within the constraints of Gutenberg, and that was, I think, largely a one man show, compared to the team developing Gutenberg. So doing it the way it was done cannot have been due to the amount of work required, it should have/must have been a design choice (albeit one I can’t see a clear rationale for).

    Somehow this keeps feeling a little in-between, like the Admin interface experiments between 2.3 and 2.7. To me, Gutenberg still feels 2.5ish from a user as well as developer point of view.

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