8 Comments

  1. Neo
    · Reply

    The good thing about this was that the speed on the internet increased. Webpages where loading so much faster then before facebook went down. The sad thing that since it is back up we have a slower internet again and we still have to live with all the crap people are saying and posting on fb, opinions, comments, aggression, insulting each other once they have a different view, irritating advertisements that are pushed down our throats and a all the nonsense about their daily (un)happy lives. As if they do not have live without facebook. I liked the fb silence during 6 hours. For me: It should/could have stayed that way.

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  2. Randy Canegaly
    · Reply

    This just pushed “Stop messing around finish the website.” to the top of my list.

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  3. Peter Shaw
    · Reply

    This is why buddypress is the most important aspect of WordPress.

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  4. Guti
    · Reply

    Not only is a matter of content availability, but posting on a social network makes your content unavailable to you. There is not an easy way to export it and migrate it a different please, it is hard to search…

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  5. Bastian
    · Reply

    As long as the RSS format doesn’t evolve from the middle ages to address the needs of the modern web (notifications, ease of use, etc.), sadly I don’t see the Open Web significantly eroding the dominance of private social networks.

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    • James
      · Reply

      RSS isn’t really a format that has to change. It’s just a stream of data.

      Think of it like all of Twitter’s content, but with no Twitter app or site to interpret it, so that’s where RSS clients come into play.

      Just like how you need a Twitter app to fully experience Twitter, you plug those RSS feeds into a good RSS client, like NetNewsWire https://netnewswire.com/ (also free and open source), and suddenly you have the “notifications, ease of use, etc.” that you were looking for.

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  6. Adde
    · Reply

    The intent of the “good people” is to crack down on all speech that is not in line with the officially endorsed and allowed view on any matter, giving the government the power to regulate (ban) and criminalize it. That’s why they label it “hate” and “misinformation”.

    The logical, and obviously wrong, consequence of your unconstitutional reasoning is this: If people choose to say the wrong things on the corporate social products, why should they be permitted to have their own website and email anyone freely? That is the opposite of what we want: silencing threats to public safety and prosecuting criticism of the administration and other types of domestic terrorism.

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