Akismet Testing Out Partner Program

akismet logoAkismet has started an experimental partner program. Based on the information presented, it looks like this is aimed more at consultants who deal with clients and instead of possibly using their own Akismet API key, they’ll now be able to refer them to Akismet via a special link which indicates the three plans that users can choose from. What caught my eye regarding the different account levels is how they have been structured.

Pro ($59/yr or $5/mo)
For individual sites, up to 80,000 comments/mo.

Enterprise ($550/yr or $50/mo)
For multiple medium size sites, up to 80,000 comments/mo (total).

Corporate ($3950/yr or $395/mo)
For corporate sites, up to 300,000 comments/mo with key monitoring, priority service and annual invoicing.

What constitutes a comment? Are we talking about all comments in general that need to be filtered or 80,000 legitimate comments? A little clarity on that part would be good. Those who are chosen to be part of this strictly invitational program only, will receive $24.00 for Pro subscriptions while Enterprise subscriptions will net them $240.00. I’m very hesitant on calling this a referral program because of the following text presented on the page:

This partner program is intended for use with your existing clients. Linking to your referrer code on the internet, or in any way promoting it to people that aren’t your customers is prohibited, and will result in your being removed from the program. The plan here is to have less spam, not more!

If you’re interested in being a guinea pig for this program, you can sign up here but keep in mind that just because you register doesn’t guarantee you will be accepted. By the way, WPCandy was able to receive 25 openings which may help boost your chances of being accepted.

By far, the most interesting aspect of this entire partner plan is the fact that the links people receive will contain ONLY the plans for which users must pay for. I wonder if this will translate into more paying customers for the service or if users will shy away and either use an alternative anti-spam solution or figure out how to get by using it for free. The only way we’ll know the answer to that is if Akismet shares the data they collected during the beta portion of the program.

5 Comments


  1. The other kicker is that people cannot just add their affiliate link anywhere on the web and hope to receive credit — they’re really gearing this towards affiliates that have clients that need it, not just affiliate marketers in general.

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  2. I’m kind of skeptical about this program based on the fact that the single site option ($59/yr) and the multiple medium site option ($550/yr) have the exact same total cap on comments (80,000). There’s no additional overhead in processing requests from multiple domains … so if it’s the same account with the same activity cap, what’s the point of a ~$500 price jump between the two?

    It almost seems to be penalizing people who work with more than one domain. But I might be a bit biased in that regard because I split my personal blog across multiple domains to better segregate, style, and manage categorical content. At the same time, all of my sites are still a single WP network installation with a single instance of Akismet filtering comments … in this paradigm, I’d be limited to 80,000 comments no matter what, but would I end up paying $59/yr or $550/yr?

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  3. We checked this out and another part we wondered about is definition of a site. We use multi-site domain mapping so technically we have one site and a bunch of sub-sites under it. Think we could get by with one API Key?

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  4. I think that WP should stop monetizing the ‘filtering of spam comments’ part. Its better to focus monetization on areas which will enable publishers to be more productive and make more money themselves. That way, they’ll be glad to pay for a service.

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  5. Hmm, this is a bit like the problem with Google Adwords, where they ‘discourage ‘ illegal clicks but still charge the advertiser for them.

    Blog owners have no influence on the number of spam comments, so I do hope they mean legitimate comments. It is not good if any company (including Automattic) has a financial incentive to spam WordPress blogs.

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