13 Comments

  1. Jeremy Green

    Great article about the benefits of good documentation. I know I could use fewer support tickets. :-) Here area a couple resources that helped me improve my documentation writing skills:

    https://jacobian.org/writing/great-documentation/
    http://docs.writethedocs.org/writing/beginners-guide-to-docs/

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  2. Dinsan

    // Little is known about the documentation writers out there who shed their blood, sweat, and tears to ensure everything runs smoothly. //

    Well said!!

    PS: I recently changed my career to become a technical writer. As a WordPress fan (been using WordPress for more than 7 years), I would love to write some WP documentation if there are opportunities available. Any pointers?

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    • Drew Jaynes

      If you’re interested in writing technical documentation, we can always use more help writing inline docs for WordPress core. If you’re interested in writing developer-facing documentation, the docs team is still writing and editing the first version of the official Theme Developer Handbook. The best place to start for either effort (or something else) is to join the #docs channel on the official WordPress Slack team. Visit https://make.wordpress.org/chat to get started.

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    • David Gwyer

      Hi Dinsan,

      I’m currently looking for a document writer (including technical writing) so please get in touch! :)

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  3. Pat Costa

    When writing support documentation it might be a good idea to examine the bounce rates on specific pages. A high bounce rate may mean users are confused and are going elsewhere. A low bounce rate may mean users are sticking around and reading it (which is what you want).

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    • Jeff Matson

      I entirely agree to an extent. I think what you are referring to may be better attributed to time on page vs bounce rate.

      While bounce rate should always be improved upon, I have noticed in several years writing documentation for various high-traffic sites, that bounce rates are typically high within documentation and doesn’t entirely attribute to usefulness of the docs.

      Time on page, however, does indeed dramatically reflect the usefulness of docs.

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  4. Mike Schinkel (@mikeschinkel)

    Hey @Dinsan – Contact me. We are looking for someone to help us document WPLib.

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  5. Peter Cralen (@PeterCralen)

    Lord of the documentation ;)

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  6. Ihor Vorotnov (@ihorvorotnov)

    I don’t like to be that single critic but hey – it has to be said. Gravity Forms is great plugin but documentation is way far from being good. Recently I switched to GF from Ninja Forms and studied all GF docs. Then I had to open the code and see how it actually works. Then I’ve built a complete user frontend, membership and payment solution for community website, without using any extra plugins like GF + Custom Post Types etc. It’s kinda strange for me – most plugins that rock (ACF Pro, GF etc) suck in docs.

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    • Jeff Matson

      Gravity Forms does indeed need better docs, which is why they hired me. Being there for a bit over 2 months now, of course I can’t fix everything at once, but things are certainly improving.

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    • Peter Cralen (@PeterCralen)

      I don’t remember how docs was before, anyway I like how it is now there. Its well structured, really nice designed.
      Not sure if its already changed or it will be changed, but I really enjoyed to searching there for my needs and found answers there.
      So if its already your job Jeff, thank you for great job.

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