5 Comments


  1. For me personally I would like the admin section to be a little easier, there is nothing wrong with it as such but it can be a little clunky at the best of times.

    Merging MU into WordPress is a masterstroke in fairness, as it gives bloggers the ability to build a real community of people working together. Rather than your standard leave a comment and such like it will give the end user/visitor a real sense of contribution to a blog they love.

    I cannot wait for 3.0, but then I am sad.


  2. Multi-Site integration.

    Hands down. That made my life so my easier that as soon as a workable beta was available, I jumped on it.

    It took me a couple days to iron out all the kinks of my highly customized WP installs into a working WP-Multisite version, but I am a happy camper.


  3. Thanks Jeffro for writing about wpbeginner ;) Will you be attending WordCamp SF or Raleigh?


  4. Custom post types no question. I needed them for a project I started a few months ago but have since abandoned since the solution I used wasn’t all that right for the job. I use WordPress as a CMS so often it will be perfect.


  5. @wpin

    Merging MU into WordPress is a masterstroke in fairness, as it gives bloggers the ability to build a real community of people working together. Rather than your standard leave a comment and such like it will give the end user/visitor a real sense of contribution to a blog they love.

    Just FYI, the MU codebase merge into WP won’t change a thing for all the self-hosted WordPress (i.e. single-site) blogs already up and running (or yet-to-be-installed sites, either). Most self-hosted WordPress installs do not have a powerful enough server to run multi-site, as most are on shared-server environments.

    The only real change is that current WordPressMU users will, after 3.0 releases, be using WordPress (with “MultiSite” enabled in wp-config) instead of WordPressMU.

    The rest of us won’t notice any change.

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