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When do you think that WordPress is going to completely rewrite their code base so it’s an actual CMS instead of a hacked together glorified blogging system?

I find I get that question quite a lot and it annoys me. WordPress is being rewritten all the time. Check out the development that happens on Trac. Most of the people who ask questions like that haven’t had a decent look at the codebase for ages. WordPress IS way more than a glorified blogging system already and if there are specific issues you have with the way it’s coded, patches are welcome!

My favorite question and answer viaQuestions and Answers

We (the Digital Engagement team) were tasked with producing a new site at very little cost and within a six week window. To restructure the content to make it easier to find we used Google analytics to analyze typical user journeys. Harnessing user insight will be an iterative process through the ongoing development of this site.

We chose to use WordPress as it offers a simple, quick (with such a short development window) and flexible open source solution to a site primarily designed for publishing content. As such it is easy to use for a wide range of content editors and, of course, provides significant cost savings for maintenance and development. Rather than develop a theme ourselves we chose to use a theme called ‘striking’ developed by Kaptinlin that fitted what we needed with a little customization. – Via Holding the Fort

With such head-starts, the five figure medium-sized website cost quickly becomes four. The four figure small business website cost becomes three. The home-grown sideline business goes from three figures to two (many premium WordPress themes designs are available for only $50). You can even get a WordPress website on their sister site for free. Buy a domain name for it and you’re in business for just $10.

To the short-sighted web developer or designer it’s the end of days. To the business owner it should be the start of getting the website they always thought they were going to get, but never quite did, for a price they can justify, and that everyone can use. via – WordPress The Quiet Revolution

Morality Of Forking – Another well written piece covering the GPL, this thing called Spirit and an explanation that you can abide by both and still be a jerk.

Freedom is a complicated, annoying, thing, and sometimes having a freedom means you accept the consequences of that freedom. In the US, we have freedom of speech, which means we can bitch about our government if we want to. But that also means someone else, who has the polar opposite of your views, has the exact same right you do. And I will defend that person with my dying breath that they have that right, no matter how much I detest what they’re saying.

You have to keep that in perspective when you start talking about rights and legality. WooThemes had the legal right to do what they did. That doesn’t mean you don’t get to think that it was a dick move, and you may, but what it was, was 100% above-board. They were honest about it, and it was legal. The GPL affords us the freedom to make plugins, fork WordPress if we wanted, and do what we want, so long as we don’t restrict the freedoms even more.

via The Legality Of Forking | Ipstenu.

The WordPress ecosystem is rife with copycats and we’re severely lacking a couple of unique ideas. Due to the popularity of WordPress and the obvious success that designers / developers and businesses have experienced in recent years, many more are flocking to the platform to make a quick buck. Which would’ve been absolutely fantastic for all those involved, except that these newcomers are not bringing much newness to the table.

via The Copycat Stagnation | Adii.

When you are asked to speak at a WordCamp, realize that you are one in hundreds of people they could have asked. It’s humbling and ego-inflating, but it is also a responsibility. You aren’t talking to people who have no clue what you are talking about. You will be facing people who probably know more than you, so your job will be to help them see it in a new way, to open their minds to the possibilities, to spark their enthusiasm, and tap into the passion. It’s a tough job, so if they come calling, don’t take it for granted. It’s a privilege.

via What’s Involved for a Speaker at a WordCamp Event « Lorelle on WordPress.