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  1. The suggestion here – I’m not a user – is that just the installation package is complete and up to date. How is that different from uploading the latest WordPress to your server and then seeking out the different add-ons that you need? With the right protection all themes are hidden, as far as coding goes, from casual view, so little real advantage for commercial themes there.

    The one bonus that I can see, for those who build many different sites with WordPress, is that a package can be saved for one site and another for the next. The saving is, I take it, on someone else’s server, which saves space.

    Other advantages? Sorry, but to be honest I see few.

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    • Hi Viktoria – I developed this tool for my own use at first – I was always adding the same 10 plugins and starter theme to my WordPress installations for each of my clients – the process to add plugins (new, add, search, click, install, activate) was getting boring. I wanted to have all of that ready to go when I installed WP at the start. If you have a commercial theme you have purchased you can upload it to your account and add it to your installer configuration to use anytime in the future. Hope that makes it clearer and please try out WProller.com and let me know what you think.

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  2. @Viktoria Michaelis – It’s not much different. But your last point is the one that actually has a decent market. As I chronicled in the post, people have been looking for an easy way to create these installation profiles over the past few years. Now they can create specialized packages of WordPress complete with all of the plugins or themes they need without having to search and install multiple times. Let’s say you are dealing with customers that are within the same niche, you can then use WPRoller to create a WordPress package that is tailored to that niche and then you’ll only need to tweak it here and there to match the clients needs. I think that’s a big time saver for developers.

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