5 Comments


  1. Hi Sarah! This is super-exciting… but…

    It’s actually very cool and I think useful. Especially for technical blogs. For a group arts blog like my own, I fear that it’s going to be more confusing than the majority of my non-tech authors are going to be comfortable with. IDK how it will develop and I’ll definitely keep an eye on their progress. TY!

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  2. This is a great idea. It’s a bit confusing to use right now, but I’m sure it’ll be excellent in the future. I think there’s a lot of room to improve the publishing workflow for WP users. I would love to be able to not only collaborate, but consolidate my entire publishing workflow to WP – ideas > rough draft > final draft > published. Only having one draft type and keeping lists of ideas elsewhere online gets a bit untidy and time consuming for me.

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  3. Congrats to Aaron as he recently obtained the funding amount he asked for and is hoping to get a little more. As I read into this, I could see it becoming an excellent feature of WordPress.

    With the announcement of Automattic acquiring the company CloudUp and specifying that co-editing would become a feature of WordPress.com and perhaps WordPress.org through the JetPack plugin, where does that leave the need for something like Post Forking?

    http://techcrunch.com/2013/09/25/automattic-acquires-file-sharing-service-cloudup-to-build-faster-media-library-and-enable-co-editing/

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  4. @Jeffro-

    I think that co-editing and post forking are solving similar but different problems. Post Forking is entirely asynchronous while it sounds like what Automattic is hoping to do is going to be more synchronous.

    Post Forking also won’t rely upon any external third party services, which means it can be used inside firewalls where you can’t use Jetpack.

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