17 Comments


  1. I think that if you’re going to use the tag, then the recommended way of doing it should be the way Christian Foellmann did it: by also adding the tag to the short description as well as to the first paragraph of the long description.

    By just adding the tag like Pippin has done, it will only show for people explicitly looking for the tag.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but adding the tag basically means that the developer will no longer update the plugin, right? So, if a plugin author does not add any other information, users unaware of the tags will still install the plugin, with all risks involved.

    I would therefore suggest tag, short description, long description; that is if you really want someone to take over development…

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    1. I fully agree with Piet on this, that would be better practice and would help developers really adopting those plugins. Give some description, maybe a contact link, even a GitHub repo could help making the fork/ adopt process more easy for all sides involved.

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      1. Looking at the way Christian Foellmann added the adopt me tag and how Pippin did it, I can see how Christian would have a much better chance at getting a developer to adopt the plugin. By just adding the tag, it’s tiny and easy to miss if you don’t know where to look. Christian’s method places the adopt me text in the three areas where it would be the most noticeable.

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  2. Pippin

    That tag (to me) means I’d like to transfer the plugin, not necessarily that I won’t be updating it anymore. If a user reports a bug, I will still fix it.

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  3. chriso199

    I do not think it is so important that the tag takes off(at least initially). It does at least give other developers the opportunity for find plugins for adoption, whereas before it was more difficult. At least it is a first step in what I would consider the right direction.

    The tag does probably need to be well publicised however.

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  4. Uh oh, I’m afraid I might turn into a crazy cat person and start taking in stray plugins…

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  5. Maybe instead of just adding a readme.txt tag, we should also encourage putting the up-for-adoption Plugin on GitHub (if it’s not already there), so that anyone wanting to adopt the Plugin can make pull requests?

    That’s basically what George Stephanis did with Update Control, which I now maintain. The Plugin was already on GitHub, and I started making pull requests. He then added me as a GitHub committer, and then as an SVN committer.

    The problem with *just* going with the “adopt-me” tag is that the only way to implement an adoption is to skip straight to the SVN-committer step, which requires a great deal of trust. But with GitHub, there’s a built-in trust-building mechanism:

    1) Pull Requests (merges must be accepted by the repo owner)
    2) Add as GitHub committer (can commit directly to GitHub repo)
    3) Add as SVN committer (can commit directly to Plugins SVN)

    Note also: this mechanism doesn’t even require an “adopt-me” tag; anyone who finds a Plugin that could use some love (a bugfix, major updates, whatever) can make pull requests if the Plugin has a GitHub repo.

    Side thought: how could would it be to have git.wordpress.org/chipbennett/plugin-slug – basically, a WordPress-centric GitHub?

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    1. In my opinion, the adopt-me tag has no future as it is only addressing the case of plugin authors willing to transfer a plugin.

      I am a great believer of the GitHub concept to save the contributors from demotivation.

      I also think that WordPress (core) should allow notifications of plugin updates from other sources (not only WordPress repository)

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